Overview

January 2, 1950 (Monday)

[note]

 

Korean_War

Korean_War

Stalin and Mao

Mao is in Moscow and in an interview with a TASS correspondent he says:

"Among those problems [I have in mind] the foremost are the matters of the current treaty of Friendship and Alliance between China and the Soviet Union, and of the Soviet Union's loan to the People's Republic of China, and the matter of trade and of a trade agreement between our two countries."
Molotov Anastas Mikoyan
Korean_War Korean_War

Then later in the day Mao met with Molotov and Mikoyan, and outlined three options which in his opinion were possible:

(1) We may sign a new Sino-Soviet alliance treaty. This will be very favorable to us. [By doing this], Sino-Soviet relations will be consolidated on the basis of the new treaty; China's workers, peasants, intellectuals, and leftist nationalist bourgeois will be greatly encouraged while rightist nationalist bourgeoisie be isolated; internationally we will have more political strength [zhenzhi ziben] to deal with imperialist countries and to examine all treaties signed by China and imperialist countries in the past.

(2) We may ask our news agencies to issue a joint communiqué, only mentioning that our two sides have exchanged views on the old Sino-Soviet Friendship and Alliance treaty and other problems, and we have reached a consensus on all important problems....

(3) We may sign an open statement, but not a treaty, to list the principles underlying our relationship.

Korean_War

Zhou Enlai

Mao made it clear that only if the first choice was to be implemented would Zhou be called to Moscow; otherwise, Zhou would not come.

Korean_War

Molotov confirmed immediately that he believed the first option was best and Zhou should come to Moscow. Mao then asked if a new treaty would be signed to replace the old treaty.

Molotov's answer was again affirmative. Mao decided that it was time for Zhou Enlai to come to Moscow.[54] [note]


Korean_War

[note]

Korean_War

Korean_War

On March 5, 1946 Churchill made his now famous "Iron Curtin Speech" at Fulton College, in Fulton Missouri, a week later on March 12, 1946 Truman in a speech before a joint session of congress, announced what has become know as the Truman Doctrine. These two speeches were then followed by General Marshall's Harvard University speech June 5, 1947 which formulated the European Aid Program commonly known as the Marshall Plan.

The 13 page article in this weeks Time Magazine, recounts Churchill's life, his writings and his warnings. [note]

Notes for Monday January 2, 1950