19500730 0000 Stratemeyer SUNDAY

30 July
1950

 

B-29s struck with 23 aircraft the Chosen Nitrogen Chemical Company plant at Konan (Hŭngnam) which is 50 miles north of Wonsan.[155-Actually, 47 aircraft struck the target. (Futrell, p 190.)]
Explosions rocked planes which were above 15,000 feet. Initial strike with radar; overcast cleared away, presumably by heat generated by ground fires, remainder bombing visual. Raid highly successful.


1220 hours conferred with CINCFE. Took with me the plans for FEAF support of Formosa should that island be attacked by the Chinese Communists. He approved the plan as drawn for planning purposes. Copies of same, after approval, dispatched to Turner and Stearley, cautioning them to limit the knowledge of this plan to certain few of their staff and also to bear in mind that it was for planning purposes only.

Partridge called; on his behalf sent the following personal redline to Vandenberg:

Partridge's headquarters with Timberlake now permanently in Korea. His rear echelon at Nagoya still has the job of air defense of the islands of Japan and the other necessary duties required of a rear echelon. He needs and has urged me to secure for him a good brigadier general to take on the job at Nagoya. At one time, as you remember, we had two air divisions in Japan to run the air defense set-up. Because of shortage of both officers and enlisted personnel, I eliminated the two air divisions and set up three air defense areas with wing commanders in charge of air defense. It is noted that an air division was recently activated in Europe headed up by a general officer. I feel that since we are at war our genuine need for a general officer at Nagoya is greater than that of Europe. As you know, General Weyland did not replace General Crabb. Crabb cannot be released for Nagoya assignment. Partridge feels and I agree with him that we need a general officer to command his rear echelon. Colonel Edwin L. Tucker, who has been here two and one-half years, is the commander there now but he must be sent home for compassionate reasons. I urge the immediate dispatch of a young and up and at 'em general.


Radio received from USAF from Twining stating that Brig General Theron B. Henebry (Reserve) being recalled to active duty to command Reserve light bomb wing being activated and deployed as unit to my command.[156-

This Air Reserve unit was the 452nd BW(L), which had less than two weeks notice before being recalled on August 10. Considered to be the most ready of the Air Force Reserve wings, the Long Beach-based 452nd
had a great deal of talented personnel, with many of its members working for the various aircraft plants in the area.

On October 25, the first B26 of the 452nd arrived in Japan, and the first wing mission was flown two days later. From recall to combat took exactly 77 days. (Gerald T. Cantwell, The Evolution and Employment of the Air Force Reserve as a Mobilization Force, 1946-1980 [Robins AFB, Ga., 1981], pp 20-25.)


Thereon B. Henebry should not be confused with Brig Gen John B. Henebry, who took command of the 315th Air Division on February 8, 1951.

]
Mr. Akabane[157-Unable to identify this individual.] was in briefly at 1530 hours. Have him settled with a yen salary acceptable to him out at FEAMCOM. Gave him a letter of introduction to Doyle.

 


 

 

 

x155. Actually, 47 aircraft struck the target. (Futrell, p 190.)

x156. This Air Reserve unit was the 452nd BW(L), which had less than two weeks notice before being recalled on August 10. Considered to be the most ready of the Air Force Reserve wings, the Long Beach-based 452nd
had a great deal of talented personnel, with many of its members working for the various aircraft plants in the area.

On October 25, the first B26 of the 452nd arrived in Japan, and the first wing mission was flown two days later. From recall to combat took exactly 77 days. (Gerald T. Cantwell, The Evolution and Employment of the Air Force Reserve as a Mobilization Force, 1946-1980 [Robins AFB, Ga., 1981], pp 20-25.)


Thereon B. Henebry should not be confused with Brig Gen John B. Henebry, who took command of the 315th Air Division on February 8, 1951.


x157. Unable to identify this individual.