Biography

Doyle, James Henry
[VAdm ComPhibGru One]

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

biography
ComPhibGru One

James Henry Doyle (1897–1982) was Vice Admiral for the United States Navy. During the Korean War he was Commander of an Amphibious ready group.

biography

Photo #: 80-G-423189

Rear Admiral James H. Doyle, USN,
Commander, Task Force 90

On the bridge of his flagship, USS Mount McKinley (AGC-7), in mid-September 1950, immediately prior to the Inch'ŏn Invasion.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

James Henry Doyle
biography
Born 1897
Jamaica, Queens
Died 1982 (aged 84–85)
Allegiance United States
Service/branch United States Navy
Rank Vice Admiral
Commands held Amphibious Group 1
Battles/wars World War II: Solomon Islands campaign
Korean War: Battle of Inchon
Awards Legion of Merit

James Henry Doyle (1897–1982) was Vice Admiral for the United States Navy. During the Korean War he commanded the U.S. Navy, Marines, and Army forces of Amphibious Group 1, and was personally responsible for the execution of the amphibious phase of the Battle of Inchon in 1950. Admiral Doyle’s naval attack force put 13,000 Marines ashore on a coastline, together with all their heavy weapons and equipment.

Biography

James Henry Doyle was born in Astoria, Long Island, New York, on 29 August 1897, son of John J. and Elizabeth (Johnson) Doyle. He attended the Jamaica Model School and Jamaica High School before entering the US Naval Academy in 1916 by appointment from the Second Congressional District of New York. He had World War I service as a Midshipman during the summers of 1917 and 1918 in the USS Arkansas and the USS Connecticut, successively. Graduated with the Class of 1920 on 6 June 1919, he was commissioned Ensign and subsequently advanced in rank, attaining that of Rear Admiral to date from 7 August 1947. On 1 November 1953 he was transferred to the Retired List of the US Navy, and was advanced to the rank of Vice Admiral on the basis of combat service.

From his graduation in 1919, until August 1926, he served consecutively in the USS Mercury, USS Pennsylvania, USS George E. Badger, USS Delaware, and the USS Camden. On 1 August 1926 he reported for duty in the Office of the Judge Advocate General of the Navy, Navy Department, Washington, DC, and while so attached attended the George Washington University Law School. He graduated with distinction in 1929, receiving the degree of Bachelor of Laws.

Returning to duty afloat in July 1929, he joined the USS Lawrence as Executive Officer, and in August 1930 transferred in a similar capacity to the USS Buchanan. Detached from the latter in June 1932, he served the next three years in the Office of the Judge Advocate General, after which between June 1935 and June 1937 he was Aide and Flag Secretary on the Staff of Commander Destroyers, Battle Force, USS Detroit, flagship. He commanded the USS Sands until August 1938, and for the next two years was Aide to the Commandant, Sixteenth Naval District and the Navy Yard, Cavite, Philippine Islands. In August 1940 he assumed command of Destroyer Division 67 in the Atlantic, with additional duty as Commanding Officer of the USS Herndon. The next month that Division was turned over to the British Navy at Halifax, under the exchange of bases for destroyers agreement, and the Herndon was later renamed HMS Churchill.

On 24 September 1940, when detached from command of Destroyer Division 67, he reported as Commanding Officer of the USS Regulus, serving until May 1942. He then had duty on the staff of Commander Amphibious Force, South Pacific. He was awarded the Legion of Merit "For exceptionally meritorious conduct...during the Solomon Islands Campaign, from August 7, 1942 to July 15, 1943." The citation further states: "Displaying gallant determination and outstanding ability, (he) participated in the initial occupation of Guadalcanal and Tulagi and in all subsequent phases of the Solomon Islands Campaign during this hazardous period. Subjected to numerous enemy air attacks and bombardments by hostile shore batteries, he carried out his highly important tasks with the utmost courage, perseverance and heroic devotion to duty, thereby contributing in large measure to the success of our forces in that strategic area."

He served in the Navy Department, Headquarters of the Commander in Chief, US Fleet, from November 1943 to April 1945, and after brief duty with Commander Cruisers, Pacific Fleet, he assumed command in May of that year of the USS Pasadena. He was awarded the Bronze Star Medal with Combat "V," for this final period of the war. The citation states in part: "For meritorious service as the Commanding Officer of the USS Pasadena...in the Western Pacific area from June 2 to September 1, 1945. Exercising ability and initiative, (he) skillfully directed his vessel in three anti-shipping sweeps and one shore bombardment in Japanese Empire home waters, in addition to outstanding service as a unit of the support force of the SECOND Carrier Task Force. Later, during the initial entry and occupation phases at Sagami Wan, (he) ably conducted his vessel as Flagship for the Commander of the Support Force..." Detached from command of the Pasadena in May 1946, he was a member of the Military Staff Committee of the Security Council, United Nations, at the United Nations Headquarters in New York. He remained there until September 1947, when he became Inspector-Instructor of Naval Reserves in the Thirteenth Naval District, with headquarters in Seattle, Washington. Ordered in January 1948 to the Amphibious Training Command, Pacific Fleet, based at Coronado, California, he assumed command of that unit on 26 March of that year, and in January 1950 reported as Commander Amphibious Group ONE, with additional duty as Commander Transport Squadron ONE. He was later detached from the additional duty.

Korea

For outstanding services during hostilities in the Korean area he was awarded the Army Silver Star Medal and the Distinguished Service Medal. The citations follow in part: Army Silver Star Medal - "(As)...Commander Attack Force, Joint Task Force SEVEN, United Nations Command, (he) distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry in action in the Inchon-Sŏul operation during the period September 15 to September 21, 1950. His actions contributed materially to the success of this operation..."

Distinguished Service Medal - "For exceptionally meritorious service...as the Commander Amphibious Group ONE, and Commander Task Force NINETY in operations against enemy forces in the Korean Area from June 25, 1950 to January 1, 1951. Directing the maneuvers of his various units with exceptional skill and foresight he was personally responsible for the success of the administrative landing of the FIRST Cavalry Division at Pohang-Dong, and for the planning and execution of the amphibious phases of the assault on Inchon and landings at Wonsan. Later, in the redeployment of friendly forces from Hungnam to Pusan, Rear Admiral Doyle, by his wise leadership, tireless efforts and profound knowledge of amphibious warfare, furnished the guidance for a unique and completely successful evacuation. His distinguished service throughout the whole of this critical period reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service.

In September 1951 he reported as President of the Board of Inspection and Survey, Navy Department, and continued to serve in that capacity until May 1952, when he became Chairman of the Joint Amphibious Board, with headquarters at Little Creek, Virginia. He was relieved of all active duty pending his retirement effective 1 November 1953.

Awards


biography

biography
biography
biography
biography
biography

biography
biography

biography
biographybiography
biography

biography

biography

biography

biography

biography

biography
 
Distinguished Service Medal Army Silver Star Medal Legion of Merit with Combat "V"
Bronze Star Medal, Combat "V" World War I Victory Medal, Atlantic Fleet Clasp American Defense Service Medal, Fleet Clasp
American Campaign Medal; Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal with one silver star and two bronze stars (seven engagements); World War II Victory Medal;
Navy Occupation Service Medal, Asia Clasp National Defense Service Medal Korean Service Medal;
United Nations Service Medal; Philippine Liberation Ribbon.  

In addition to the

Distinguished Service Medal. , the

Army Silver Star Medal and the

Legion of Merit with Combat "V," and the

Bronze Star Medal, also with "V," Rear Admiral Doyle has the

World War I Victory Medal, Atlantic Fleet Clasp; the

American Defense Service Medal, Fleet Clasp; the

American Campaign Medal;

Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal with one silver star and two bronze stars (seven engagements); the

World War II Victory Medal; the

Navy Occupation Service Medal, Asia Clasp; the

National Defense Service Medal; the

Korean Service Medal; the

United Nations Service Medal; and the

Philippine Liberation Ribbon.

He married the former Eleanor Ruth Fields of Brookline, Massachusetts. Their two sons are Lieutenant J. H. Doyle, Jr., USN (USNA Class of 1947); and John J. Doyle. Vice Admiral Doyle was a member of the Bar of the District of Columbia and had been admitted to practice before the Supreme Court and Court of Appeals of the District. VADM Doyle died in Oakland, California, 9 February 1981.

Source: Adapted from the biographical sketch for Vice Admiral James H. Doyle, USN, Navy Biographies Branch, OI-023, 21 December 1953, now part of the Modern Biographies files, Navy Department Library, Naval History & Heritage Command. Related Images: Inchon Invasion Command Activities, September 1950.

AWARDS AND CITATIONS

biography

Navy Distinguished Service Medal



Awarded for actions during the Korean War

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Distinguished Service Medal to Rear Admiral James Henry Doyle (NSN: 0-20455), United States Navy, for exceptionally meritorious and distinguished service in a position of great responsibility to the Government of the United States, as the Commander, Amphibious Group ONE, and Commander Task Force NINETY in operations against enemy forces in the Korean area from 25 June 1950 to 1 January 1951. Directing the maneuvers of his various units with exceptional skill and foresight, he was personally responsible for the success of the administrative landing of the FIRST Cavalry Division at Pohang-Dong, and for the planning and execution of the amphibious phases of the assault on Inchon and landings at Wonsan. Later, in the redeployment of friendly forces from Hungnam to Pusan, Rear Admiral Doyle, by his wise leadership, tireless efforts, and profound knowledge of amphibious warfare, furnished the guidance for a unique and completely successful evacuation. His distinguished service throughout the whole of this critical period reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service.

General Orders: Commander in Chief Pacific: Serial 0157 (February 1, 1951)

Action Date: June 25, 1950 - January 1, 1951

Service: Navy

Rank: Rear Admiral

biography

Silver Star



Awarded for actions during the Korean War

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Army Award) to Rear Admiral James Henry Doyle (NSN: 0-20455), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as Commander, Attack Force, Joint Task Force SEVEN, United Nations Command, in action in the Inchon-Sŏul operation during the period 15 September to 21 September 1950. His actions contributed materially to the success of this operation and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

General Orders: Headquarters, VIII U.S. Army Korea, General Orders No. 49 (October 27, 1950)

Action Date: September 15 - 21, 1950

Service: Navy

Rank: Rear Admiral

biography

Legion of Merit



Awarded for actions during the World War II

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Legion of Merit with Combat "V" to Captain James Henry Doyle (NSN: 0-20455), United States Navy, for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services to the Government of the United States on the Staff of Commander Amphibious Force, South Pacific, during the period from 7 August 1942 to 15 July 1943. Captain Doyle participated in the initial occupation of Guadalcanal-Tulagi and in all subsequent phases of the Solomon Islands campaign including the occupation of the Russel Islands and the attack on New Georgia. During the above mentioned period he was subjected to at least thirteen enemy air attacks and two bombardments by shore batteries. Under these most difficult conditions he repeatedly demonstrated, in the highest degree, his courage, persistence, determination, and devotion to duty. His conduct throughout was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. (Captain Doyle is authorized to wear the Combat "V".)

General Orders: Commander South Pacific: Serial 001979 (September 28, 1943)

Action Date: August 7, 1942 - July 15, 1943

Service: Navy

Rank: Captain





Obituary

Vice Adm. James Henry Doyle, commander of the Amphibious Task Forces that carried out the landing at Inchon and the later evacuation of nearly 200,000 soldiers and civilians from Hungnam in the Korean War, died Monday at the Naval Regional Center in Oakland, Calif. He was 83 years old and lived in San Francisco.

Admiral Doyle, a much-decorated officer, saw action in the Pacific in World War II and was in charge of submarine demolition in Coronado, Calif., before being recalled to the Far East for action.

He commanded Gen. Douglas MacArthur's amphibious transports, which moved 1,000 miles from Japan to put the First Cavalry Division ashore on the east coast of Korea at Pohang in July 1950. Army and Navy officers said at the time that Admiral Doyle and his staff had performed a ''superhuman task'' and the ''fastest staging in the history'' of amphibious warfare, completing the operation within 12 hours.

Two months later, Admiral Doyle oversaw the Inchon landing on the Korean west coast, near Sŏul. The move was General MacArthur's counterstroke to cut off the North Korean Army and retake the South Korean capital. Two Weeks of Evacuation

But by December 1950, General MacArthur was forced to redeploy and ordered the evacuation of American and South Korean units from northeast Korea.

For two weeks in freezing weather and under heavy enemy fire, Admiral Doyle supervised the evacuation of 105,000 soldiers, 91,000 Korean civilians, 17,500 vehicles and 350,000 tons of supplies and equipment.

Admiral Doyle was born in Jamaica, Queens, and graduated from the Naval Academy in Annapolis in 1920. He earned a doctor of jurisprudence degree at George Washington University Law School in 1929 and did some of his on-shore service in the Judge Advocate General's Office.

He also served with the United States military staff at the fledgling United Nations. Admiral Doyle won the Legion of Merit, a Silver Star, the Distinguished Service Medal and numerous campaign decorations. After his retirement in 1953, he practiced law in Austin, Tex., and was active in civic affairs before moving to San Francisco in 1979. He is survived by two sons, Vice Adm. James H. Doyle, U.S.N., retired, of Bethesda, Md., and John Doyle, an Oakland lawyer; a sister, Mary Lesser of Garden City, L.I.; three grandchildren, and one great-granddaughter.

A service was scheduled for Thursday in the Naval Academy chapel in Annapolis, to be followed by burial in the Naval Academy cemetery.

June 25, 1950

The invasion of South Korea found Admiral Doyle's Amphibious Group busy with its training duties. On the morning of the 25th Task Force 90 got underway from Yokosuka, with elements of the 35th Regimental Combat Team embarked, to conduct landing exercises outside Tokyo Bay. Although operations were carried out on the 26th and 28th, in accordance with the training order, the attention of both teachers and pupils was progressively distracted by reports of happenings in Korea. During the second landing observers from the Far East Air Forces were ordered back to their stations; on completion of the exercise the ships returned at once to Yokosuka to debark the troops.

June 26, 1950 0900

biography

          The invasion of South Korea found Admiral Doyle's Amphibious Group busy with its training duties. On the morning of the 25th Task Force 90 got underway from Yokosuka, with elements of the 35th Regimental Combat Team embarked, to conduct landing exercises outside Tokyo Bay. Although operations were carried out on the26th and 28th, in accordance with the training order, the attention of both teachers and pupils was progressively distracted by reports of happenings in Korea. During the second landing observers from the Far East Air Forces were ordered back to their stations; on completion of the exercise the ships returned at once to Yokosuka to debark the troops.