Biography

Huff, Lt. Col. Gilman A.
[LtCol CO 2Bn7thCR]

biography biography

HUFF GILMAN A - O-0408081 - 1950/10/09 - SC - Greenville - RTD - 7th Cav Regt (Inf)-1st Cav Div

NAME OF CASUALTY HUFF GILMAN A HUFF GILMAN A
SERVICE PREFIX AND NUMBER O-0408081 O-0408081
GRADE LTC Lt. Colonel
GRADE CODE C Lieutenant Colonel
BRANCH IN Infantry
PLACE OF CASUALTY L5 South Korea
DAY OF CASUALTY 9 9
MONTH OF CASUALTY 10 OCTOBER
YEAR OF CASUALTY & 1950
STATE OF RESIDENCE 47 South Carolina
COUNTY OF RESIDENCE 045 Greenville
TYPE OF CASUALTY RTD Returned to Duty (FECOM)
PREVIOUS/DETAIL CODE OF CASUALTY 4 Seriously wounded in action by missile
CASUALTY GROUP CODE F Returned to Duty (FECOM)
PLACE OF DISPOSITION L7 Japan
DAY OF DISPOSITION 11 11
BLANK
MONTH OF DISPOSITION 0 Oct
YEAR OF DISPOSITION & 1950
YEAR OF BIRTH
MILITARY OCCUPATIONAL SPECIALTY CODE 1542 Field Communications Chief
TROOP PROGRAM SEQUENCE NUMBER 16001 CV DIV INF - 1ST
TROOP PROGRAM SEQUENCE NUMBER ELEMENT SEQUENCE 60 CV DIV CAV REGT INF
UNIT 0007 0007
RACE CODE OR RACIAL GROUP CODE 1 White
COMPONENT 3 Organized Reserve Corps (ORC)
LINE OF DUTY
DISPOSITION OF EVACUATIONS

 

 

 

 

August 12, 1950

The 10th Division did not jump off until August 12, three days behind the 3rd, a lapse that gave Hap Gay time to redeploy Clainos's Clouters.

The 2/7 now had a new, aggressive, and battle-experienced commander. He was Gilman A. Huff, a former enlisted man who had won a battlefield commission and numerous medals for valor in the ETO. He was "a strange individual," Gay wrote, a "trial" and a "drunk" when resting but a wonderful" fighter in war.

The 2/7 was backed by the steady 77th FAB. Its commander, William A. ("Billy") Harris, was a West Point (1933) classmate of Pete Clainos and an aggressive and colorful officer. He was one of two sons of a retired Army major general and the nephew of West Pointer General Peter C. Harris, who had been the powerful adjutant general of the Army in World War I and afterward. Billy's older brother, Hunter, one year ahead of him at West Point, was a well-known Air Force bomber expert who had, in 1950, been selected as a brigadier general, and was to go on to four stars.

These high Army connections had probably saved Billy Harris from being washed out of West Point. In 1933, when he was a first classman (senior), standing high in his class, he developed such severe stomach trouble" that the medical department recommended he not graduate. Learning of this, Army Chief of Staff Douglas MacArthur summoned Harris to Washington for a personal interview. Standing at attention, knees knocking, Harris made a good case for being allowed to graduate. "Do you think you're well enough to be an officer?" MacArthur asked.

"Yes, sir," Harris replied.

"I do too," MacArthur said, concluding the interview and dismissing Cadet Harris. "Go back to West Point."

In World War II, while older brother Hunter was gaining fame and glory in the Eighth Air Force, Billy was stuck in an ETO staff job, albeit one of the most fascinating and hush-hush in the theater. He was a senior American representative on the British conceived deception plan for the Overlord invasion. Known as Fortitude, the plan was designed to convince Hitler and his generals that Overlord was a feint, that the real invasion would come at the Pas de Calais and in Norway. The job cleared Harris for Ultra (information from breaking the German military codes) and other high-level secrets, but it denied him a combat command. He finished out the war in the ETO on Omar Bradley's Twelfth Army Group intelligence staff and then spent three postwar years in the Pentagon, still suffering from a bad stomach.

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Wednesday August 2, 1950 (Day 039)