Biography

Landrum, Eugene M.
[Col CoS EUSA]

Eugene M. Landrum

biography

biography

On July 7 Johnnie Walker flew into Taejŏn for his first visit to the battlefield. There was no hint of criticism then or later about Dean's brash deployment plan. As Walker's chief of staff, Gene Landrum, recalled, Walker admired Dean unreservedly. He was just what Walker wanted: "a fighter and a doer." Walker believed that American forces could win only by relentless and continuous attacks, which would throw the NKPA off balance, that every opportunity to attack should be seized.[4-71]

Awards and Citations

biography


Army Distinguished Service Medal
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Awarded for actions during the World War II
(Citation Needed) - SYNOPSIS: Brigadier General Eugene M. Landrum (ASN: 0-4570), United States Army, was awarded the Army Distinguished Service Medal for exceptionally meritorious and distinguished services to the Government of the United States, in a duty of great responsibility during World War II.
General Orders: War Department, General Orders No. 14 (1943)
Service: Army
Rank: Brigadier General
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biography


Army Distinguished Service Medal
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Awarded for actions during the Cold War
(Citation Needed) - SYNOPSIS: Colonel Eugene M. Landrum (ASN: 0-4570), United States Army, was awarded a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Army Distinguished Service Medal for exceptionally meritorious and distinguished services to the Government of the United States, in a duty of great responsibility.
General Orders: Department of the Army, General Orders No. 4 (1951)
Service: Army
Rank: Colonel
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Whatever else MacArthur may have accomplished in Korea, he managed to secure a third star for his controversial chief of staff/X Corps commander. (Almond retired as a lieutenant general in 1953 after serving as commandant of the Army War College.) But justice sometimes prevails. When Eugene Landrum retired from the Army in February 1951, he was allowed to do so in his former rank of major general.

Still lacking subordinate corps headquarters, Walker was a one-man show. He continually moved by jeep and L-19 Bird Dog light aircraft to each point on the line as a threat emerged, personally overseeing the counter-attacks. Walker did, however, have a secret weapon: Colonel Eugene M. Landrum, his EUSAK chief of staff.


Landrum had commanded the American forces that recaptured the Aleutian island of Attu from the Japanese in World War II and, as a major general, later led the 90th Infantry Division during the brutal hedgerow fighting in Normandy in July 1944. While he'd been relieved of that command, and though he'd reverted to a colonel after the war, Walker always referred to him as "General" Landrum.

Calm, unflappable, professional and a consummate team player, Landrum was an entirely different breed of officer from Almond, and Walker trusted him completely. Since a U.S. field army in 1950 was not authorized an assistant commanding general, Landrum was Walker's de facto deputy. His primary job was to keep track of all forces in Korea and conjure up the reserves to plug any holes.

Whenever the "general" returned to headquarters, Walker's first question was, "Landrum, how many reserves have you dug up for me today?"