Biography

Moore, Ned Dalton
[Col. CO 19thIR]

biography

CO_19th_IR_WestPointer(1930)

19th Infantry, 24th Infantry Division

biography

The Chicks of the 19th now had a new commander, West Pointer (1930) Ned D. Moore, forty-three, replacing the wounded Stan Meloy. Like Mike Michaelis, Moore was an alumnus of Max Taylor's 101st Airborne Division. In the airborne assaults of the 101st in Normandy and Holland, Moore had served on Taylors headquarters staff as G-1. When the 101st was surrounded at Bastogne in the Battle of the Bulge, Moore, owing to the suicide of the incumbent, temporarily served as division chief of staff until Mike Michaelis recovered from the battle wounds he incurred in Holland.

 Moore had arrived in Japan in August 1948 and commanded a regiment of the 7th Infantry Division before moving on to the Eighth Army G-3 section. He had not ever directly commanded troops in battle; but he had been closely associated with elite, aggressive airborne infantry in combat (he was shot in the hand in Holland but refused evacuation), and he well knew what to do.[6-66]

Moore remembered: "When I reported to Walker in Korea, he told me he wanted me to take over the all-black Twenty-fourth Regiment. Nobody, including me, wanted command of the Twenty-fourth.

When Meloy got hit at the Kum River, Walker told me to take over the Nineteenth, then temporarily commanded by Tom McGrail.

I caught up with Bill Dean before the fall of Taejon and was in the division CP at Yŏngdong when the Thirty-fourth bugged out of Taejon.

Then I was on my way to Chinju with the beat-up Nineteenth.

I was `temporarily attached' for weeks as commander, but when Meloy did not return, I became permanent - and thereby escaped command of the Twenty-fourth."

August 7,1950
The visitors closely scrutinized Eighth Army's senior field commanders. Ridgway had nothing to say about the division commanders, but he judged that "some" regimental commanders were "very poor." They were too old and lacked "combat experience and aggressiveness." He named no names, but undoubtedly he was referring to the three regimental commanders in the 1st Cav (Rohsenberger, Nist, and Palmer) and the 24th Infantry's Horton White. Although both Dick Stephens (21st Infantry) and Hank Fisher (35th Infantry) were considerably overage for regimental command, they were doing well, as were the "youngsters," Michaelis (27th Infantry), Beauchamp (34th Infantry), and Moore (19th Infantry). Replacements being sent by the Pentagon didn't help. "Three out of five were over fifty," Ridgway wrote.*

 

biography

Ned Dalton Moore

Date of death: October 8, 1992
Home of record: Guthrie Center Iowa

Ned Moore graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, Class of 1930, He retired as a U.S. Army Major General.

AWARDS AND CITATIONS

biography

Distinguished Service Cross



Awarded for actions during the Korean War
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Ned D. Moore, Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while as Commanding Officer of the 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Colonel Moore distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chungam-ni, Korea, on 1 August 1950.


The President of the United States of America, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Colonel (Infantry) Ned Dalton Moore (ASN: 0-18212), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while as Commanding Officer of the 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Colonel Moore distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chungam-ni, Korea, on 1 August 1950. During a visit to the command post of his 1st Battalion, Colonel Moore discovered that the positions were in grave danger of being overrun and that the defenses were rapidly nearing a breaking point. Without hesitation, he initiated prompt action to prevent a complete collapse. In spite of intense enemy automatic weapons, small-arms, mortar, and tank fire, which was falling throughout the entire area, he voluntarily undertook the task of making a personal visit to each of the exposed front line units. He immediately went forward to a position less than one hundred yards behind the foremost rifleman of Company C and, from this position, personally began to rally the wavering frontline troops. Later, under his personal supervision, Company A was quickly reorganized and launched in an attack that regained critical terrain which had been lost to the enemy. Colonel Moore remained with the forward elements of the battalion throughout the remainder of the day, directing the employment of heavy weapons and riflemen, until the enemy attack was completely repulsed. The calm demeanor, prompt decision, absolute disregard for his own personal safety, fearless leadership, and the courageous example he exhibited were an inspiration to all members of his command and proved to be the turning point for our troops during this crucial engagement with the enemy.

General Orders: Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 75 (February 15, 1951)

Action Date: August 1, 1950

Service: Army

Rank: Colonel

Company: Commanding Officer

Regiment: 19th Infantry Regiment

Division: 24th Infantry Division

biography

 

Army Distinguished Service Medal



Awarded for actions during the Cold War

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Army Distinguished Service Medal to Major General Ned Dalton Moore (ASN: 0-18212), United States Army, for exceptionally meritorious and distinguished services to the Government of the United States, in a duty of great responsibility, during the period from January 1954 to December 1964.

General Orders: Department of the Army, General Orders No. 2 (February 5, 1965)

Action Date: January 1954 - December 1964

Service: Army

Rank: Major General


biography

Silver Star



Awarded for actions during the World War II

(Citation Needed) - SYNOPSIS: Colonel (Infantry) Ned Dalton Moore (ASN: 0-18212), United States Army, was awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action while serving as G-1 and Chief of Staff, 101st Airborne Division, during World War II.

General Orders: Headquarters, 101st Infantry Division, General Orders No. 7 (1945)

Action Date: World War II

Service: Army

Rank: Colonel

Division: 101st Airborne Division

biography

Silver Star



Awarded for actions during the Korean War

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Colonel (Infantry) Ned Dalton Moore (ASN: 0-18212), United States Army, for gallantry in action as Commanding Officer, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in action near Hasan-Dong, Korea, on 19 September 1950. During the movement of his regiment to its assembly area for the crossing of the Naktong River Colonel Moore preceded his assault elements in order to make a detailed reconnaissance of the area. Although the intensity of the enemy's fire increased as more and more elements of the regiment moved into position and severe casualties inflicted in his immediate area he remained in his exposed position to better observe and direct the river crossing. His personal presence in this critical area, combined with his calm quiet and optimistic manner proved a source of reassurance for his troops and materially assisted in the speedy and orderly execution of the assault crossing of the river. Colonel Moore's fearless example, superior leadership and devotion to duty reflect the greatest credit on himself and the United States Infantry.

General Orders: Headquarters, 24th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 242 (December 2, 1950)

Action Date: September 19, 1950

Service: Army

Rank: Colonel

Company: Commanding Officer

Regiment: 19th Infantry Regiment

Division: 24th Infantry Division

biography

 

Legion of Merit



Awarded for actions during the World War II

(Citation Needed) - SYNOPSIS: Colonel (Infantry) Ned Dalton Moore (ASN: 0-18212), United States Army, was awarded the Legion of Merit for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services to the Government of the United States as G-1 and Chief of Staff, 101st Airborne Division, during World War II.

Action Date: World War II

Service: Army

Rank: Colonel

Division: 101st Infantry Division

biography

Legion of Merit



Awarded for actions during the Korean War

(Citation Needed) - SYNOPSIS: Colonel (Infantry) Ned Dalton Moore (ASN: 0-18212), United States Army, was awarded a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Legion of Merit for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services to the Government of the United States as Commanding Officer, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, in Korea from 1951 to 1952.

Action Date: 1950 - 1951

Service: Army

Rank: Colonel

Company: Commanding Officer

Regiment: 19th Infantry Regiment

Division: 24th Infantry Division

 

July 26, 1950

Johnnie Walker had a favor to ask of Ned Moore. Walker's son, Sam, was arriving from the 82nd Airborne and needed a job. The older Walker had begun his career with the Chicks and apparently wanted Sam to carry on the family tradition. Would Moore take him?


"What kind of strings are you keeping on him?" Moore asked.


"Not a goddamned one," Walker replied. "He's just another infantry officer."
Moore took on this big responsibility, naming young Sam Walker commander of C Company in the 1/19. He remembered that Sam was "one of about fifteen kids in the regiment whose fathers had been my bosses."



As he set up his blocking position at Chinju, Ned Moore was simultaneously reorganizing and trying to re-man the decimated 19th. He had no exec; that slot was being held open for the wounded Chan Chandler, who was expected to return.

Meanwhile, the S-3, Ed Logan, was filling in as exec.

West Pointer (1942) Elliott C. Cutler, Jr., a veteran of the ETO, replaced Logan as S-3.

The 1/19 (down to about 300 men) was now temporarily commanded by Robert L. Rhea, forty.

Tom McGrail had reverted to command of the 2/19 (about 300 men).

Despite the heavy losses sustained among the junior officers, Moore found a few good, strong combat leaders still in place - for example, Mike Barszcz.[6-67]

 

Lt. Col. Harold W. Mott commanded the 2/29.[6-68] [to 3rd Bn 19th]

27 July 1950

wounded

August 14, 1950

The attack went off, per schedule, at dawn on August 14. It was raining hard. Because of that, no FEAF aircraft appeared, but the artillery laid down a ten-minute barrage.

Again carrying the burden of the attack, John Hill's 9th Infantry occupied the center. Beauchamp's 34th and Brad Smith's 1/21 were on the left; Ned Moore's 19th was on the right. Joe Walker's 2/9 smartly took its first objective; but thereafter everything went wrong, and the attack fizzled out all across the front.

The shattered 19th and 34th regiments were simply physically and mentally incapable of further offensive action. After an average gain of 500 yards against fierce NKPA resistance, Task Force Hill ground to a halt.