Biography

Ruble, Richard Waynick [RADM CNAJ]

biography  

 

RADM Richard Waynick Ruble CNAJ

A 16,64 CAPTAIN RICHARD WAYNICK RUBLE, U.S. NAVY, took command of the USS VALLEY FORGE 30 August I947. Following graduation from the Naval Academy in l923, he spent four years in battleships before taking flight training at Pensacola, Florida.

CAPTAIN RUBLE's service record includes: Fighting Squadron THREE, flight instructor at Pensacola, flight test pilot at NAS Anacostia, the Air Department of USS SARATOGA, Command of USS LAPWING, Command of USNRB and NAS Squantum, Massachusetts, Navigator of USS ENTERPRISE, Operations Officer of ComCarDiv ONE, Special Assistant to DCNO IAIRI, member of the Council on Foreign Relations, member of the Permanent Joint Board of Defense, United States and Canada, Commanding Officer USS RENDOVA, member of the first class of The National War College, Commanding Officer USS SHANGRI-LA, and ding Officer USS VALLEY FORGE.

In l933 he received a Master of Science degree ' ' Aeronautical Engineering. Comman from Massachusetts Institute of Technology In Calafain Qian! ,Wagnic v ,pi

 

 

FIRST SILVER STAR CITATION:
The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Commander Richard Waynick Ruble (NSN: 0-58209), United States Navy, for gallantry and intrepidity in action with the enemy while serving as Navigation Officer of the Aircraft Carrier U.S.S. ENTERPRISE (CV-6) throughout all of the engagements since the beginning of the war, and particularly in the Stewart Island engagement on 24 August 1942, and the action against Japanese naval forces near Santa Cruz Islands on 26 October 1942, in both of which battles that vessel was heavily attacked by large numbers of enemy aircraft. Commander Ruble's cool, deliberate, and able assistance to the Captain on the bridge, given with complete disregard for his own personal safety, contributed immeasurably to the success of his ship in these engagements. His display of exceptional courage and ability under fire was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

SECOND SILVER STAR CITATION:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star (Army Award) to Rear Admiral Richard Waynick Ruble (NSN: 0-58209), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as Commander, Carrier Division Fifteen, Joint Task Force SEVEN, United Nations Command, in the Inchon-Seoul operation during the period 15 September to 21 September 1950. His actions contributed materially to the success of this operation and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

NAVY DISTINGUISHED SERVICE MEDAL CITATION:
The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Distinguished Service Medal to Rear Admiral Richard Waynick Ruble (NSN: 0-58209), United States Navy, for exceptionally meritorious and distinguished service in a position of great responsibility to the Government of the United States as Commander Carrier Division FIFTEEN, in operations against enemy aggressor forces in the Korean Area from 2 August 1950 to 1 January 1951, inclusive. Directing the operations of this Task Group with tireless effort and exceptional skill, Rear Admiral Ruble successfully established for his unit a reputation for reliability in all phases of effort with particular emphasis on furnishing invaluable close air support to ground troops. As commander of escort carriers during the amphibious assault on Inch'ŏn, Korea, on 15 September 1950, he planned effectively in the conduct of operations which would insure the continual availability of close air support vital to the ground troops of the United States TENTH Corps. A leader of outstanding ability, judgment and aggressiveness, Rear Admiral Ruble, by his competent and forceful execution of his assigned duties, made a major contribution to the successful accomplishment of the TENTH Corps' mission in the Inch'ŏn-Seoul area, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Richard Waynick Ruble

Date of birth: 28-Feb-02
Date of death: 24-Jun-76
Place of Birth: Colorado, Ouray
Home of record: Ouray Colorado

Richard Ruble graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, Class of 1923. He retired as a U.S. Navy Vice Admiral.

AWARDS AND CITATIONS

Navy Distinguished Service Medal

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Awarded for actions during the Korean War

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Distinguished Service Medal to Rear Admiral Richard Waynick Ruble (NSN: 0-58209), United States Navy, for exceptionally meritorious and distinguished service in a position of great responsibility to the Government of the United States as Commander Carrier Division FIFTEEN, in operations against enemy aggressor forces in the Korean Area from 2 August 1950 to 1 January 1951, inclusive. Directing the operations of this Task Group with tireless effort and exceptional skill, Rear Admiral Ruble successfully established for his unit a reputation for reliability in all phases of effort with particular emphasis on furnishing invaluable close air support to ground troops. As commander of escort carriers during the amphibious assault on Inch'ŏn, Korea, on 15 September 1950, he planned effectively in the conduct of operations which would insure the continual availability of close air support vital to the ground troops of the United States TENTH Corps. A leader of outstanding ability, judgment and aggressiveness, Rear Admiral Ruble, by his competent and forceful execution of his assigned duties, made a major contribution to the successful accomplishment of the TENTH Corps' mission in the Inch'ŏn-Seoul area, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

General Orders: Board Serial 175 (February 26, 1951)

Action Date: August 2, 1950 - January 1, 1951

Service: Navy

Rank: Rear Admiral

Company: Commander

Division: Carrier Division 15

Silver Star

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Awarded for actions during the World War II

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Commander Richard Waynick Ruble (NSN: 0-58209), United States Navy, for gallantry and intrepidity in action with the enemy while serving as Navigation Officer of the Aircraft Carrier U.S.S. ENTERPRISE (CV-6) throughout all of the engagements since the beginning of the war, and particularly in the Stewart Island engagement on 24 August 1942, and the action against Japanese naval forces near Santa Cruz Islands on 26 October 1942, in both of which battles that vessel was heavily attacked by large numbers of enemy aircraft. Commander Ruble's cool, deliberate, and able assistance to the Captain on the bridge, given with complete disregard for his own personal safety, contributed immeasurably to the success of his ship in these engagements. His display of exceptional courage and ability under fire was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Action Date: August 24 & October 26, 1942

Service: Navy

Rank: Commander

Company: Navigation Officer

Division: U.S.S. Enterprise (CV-6)

Silver Star

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Awarded for actions during the Korean War

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star (Army Award) to Rear Admiral Richard Waynick Ruble (NSN: 0-58209), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as Commander, Carrier Division FIFTEEN, Joint Task Force SEVEN, United Nations Command, in the Inchon-Seoul operation during the period 15 September to 21 September 1950. His actions contributed materially to the success of this operation and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

General Orders: Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, General Orders No. 49 (October 27, 1950)

Action Date: September 15 - 21, 1950

Service: Navy

Rank: Rear Admiral




31 July 1950

With the arrival of his carriers Rear Admiral Ruble was relieved of his temporary chores as Commander Naval Air Japan and began a fancy juggling act. On the 31st he put his staff aboard Sicily at Yokosuka and sailed her for Kobe to rejoin her consort. There she loaded ground personnel, spare parts, and ammunition for VMF 214, and

1 August 1950

 on the afternoon of 1 August sailed for the southern tip of Kyushu to rendezvous with the destroyers USS Doyle (DMS-34) and USS JAMES E. KYES (DD-787). On the same afternoon USS Badoeng Strait (CVE-116) got underway from Kobe to fly off aircraft to the Itami airbase; this was completed the next day, whereupon the carrier returned to port to replenish.

2 August 1950

On the 2nd, as USS Sicily (CVE-118) was joining her escorts in Van Diemen Strait, Admiral Ruble went aboard Badoeng Strait.

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On that day, the eighth anniversary of the landing on Guadalcanal, the Marine Brigade attacked westward. In this peninsula, as on that island, the weather was hot, humid, and exhausting.

Three days of heavy and confused fighting followed while the hills controlling the road junction at Chindong-ni were cleared.

But coordinated employment of brigade artillery and of Marine aircraft commuting in from the escort carriers broke up the enemy formations and chased them back into the hills.

Tanks, vehicles, and guns were destroyed by the aviators from Admiral Ruble’s task group, and napalm and strafing helped to clear the heights.

July 12, 1950


July 2, 1950


USS Sicily (CVE-118), alerted on 2 July, was sailed on the 4th for Pearl Harbor and Guam, to strengthen the antisubmarine capabilities of Western Pacific forces.

The division commander, Rear Admiral Richard W. Ruble, was ordered forward with his staff by air to help handle the rapid build-up of naval air strength in Japan.

On 10 July admiral and staff reached Tokyo,

and two days later Ruble took over command of Task Group 96.2, Naval Air Japan.

[note]

July 4, 1950

USS Sicily (CVE-118), alerted on 2 July, was sailed on the 4th for Pearl Harbor and Guam, to strengthen the antisubmarine capabilities of Western Pacific forces.

The division commander, Rear Admiral Richard W. Ruble, was ordered forward with his staff by air to help handle the rapid build-up of naval air strength in Japan.

On 10 July admiral and staff reached Tokyo, and two days later Ruble took over command of Task Group 96.2, Naval Air Japan.

[note]

 

 

USS Sicily (CVE-118), alerted on 2 July, was sailed on the 4th for Pearl Harbor and Guam, to strengthen the antisubmarine capabilities of Western Pacific forces.

[note]

July 9, 1950

 

 

1500 hours, Vice Admiral Sprague,[89-Vice Adm Thomas L. Sprague, Commander Air Force, Pacific.] COMAIRPAC with Rear Admiral Hardison,[90-Rear Adm O.B. Hardison, Commander Naval Forces, Marianas.] COMNAVMARIANAS, and accompanying Navy officers. (Also Capt. R.W. Ruble, USN, Capt. F. H. Turner, USN, Col. S.C. Dyer, USMC, Capt. A. S. Hill, USN & Capt. A. S. Heyward, USN.

[note]

 

July 10, 1950

USS Sicily (CVE-118), alerted on 2 July, was sailed on the 4th for Pearl Harbor and Guam, to strengthen the antisubmarine capabilities of Western Pacific forces.
The division commander, Rear Admiral Richard W. Ruble, was ordered forward with his staff by air to help handle the rapid build-up of naval air strength in Japan.


On 10 July admiral and staff reached Tokyo,
and two days later [12th] Ruble took over command of Task Group 96.2, Naval Air Japan.

[note]

 


July 12, 1950

 

 

Sicily, alerted on 2 July, was sailed on the 4th for Pearl Harbor and Guam, to strengthen the antisubmarine capabilities of Western Pacific forces. The division commander, Rear Admiral Richard W. Ruble, was ordered forward with his staff by air to help handle the rapid build-up of naval air strength in Japan. On 10 July admiral and staff reached Tokyo, and two days later Ruble took over command of Task Group 96.2, Naval Air Japan.

[note]

 

 

 

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July 24, 1950

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July 31, 1950

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August 2, 1950

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September 2, 1950

 

 

So the concept of the operation took form. In early September, and again in the days preceding the landing, the three carrier units of Joint Task Force 7Admiral Ewen’s fast carriers, Admiral Ruble’s escort carriers, and the British light carrier Triumph—would work over the west coast with their efforts gradually converging toward Inchon.

Prior to D-Day a destroyer and cruiser bombardment of Wŏlmi Do would be carried out.

On the early morning tide of 15 September a battalion landing team of the 5th Marines would assault Wŏlmi in order to secure that commanding position.

On the afternoon tide, at about 1700, the main attack into the city would be carried out by the 5th Marines’ remaining two battalions and by the 1st Marines. While the two Marine regiments moved rapidly to expand their holdings to Kimp'o airfield and the Han River line, the 7th Infantry Division (Reinforced) and corps troops would be landed administratively and would then operate as ordered by the corps commander.

Throughout the operation bombardment and fire support would be provided by cruisers and destroyers, and air cover, air strikes, and close support by carrier aviation.

So far as the air was concerned Joint Task Force 7 was self-sufficient: complications of coordination or control during the landing phase were fended off by the proviso that except at the request of Admiral Struble no FEAF aircraft would operate in the objective area subsequent to D minus 3, while for the later stages of the campaign X Corps was provided with its own Tactical Air Command, composed of Marine aircraft and commanded by a Marine brigadier general.

Such was the plan for the operation as worked out by the staffs of Seventh Fleet, the Amphibious Group, and the Marine Division. For Inchon, as for Pohang-dong, the planning was necessarily carried out in violation of all the rules and in record time.

 

By 2 September, when the Joint Task Force operation plan and the Amphibious Group’s operation order were issued, Marine planning was nearing completion,

[note]

 

 

At 2205 a dispatch from FAFIK informed Admiral Ruble that the Marines desired his air effort on the 3rd and inquired as to his availability; the message was forwarded with emergency precedence to Ashiya Air Base where both VMF 214 and VMF 323 were now located. But Typhoon Jane was nearing Japan, and at Ashiya the weather was very bad.

[note]

September 5, 1950

 

 

At 1120 the KMAG detachment ashore asked the fire support unit to call for Navy air support to check an attack which had reached within half a mile of the town; an emergency dispatch to this effect reached ComNavFE shortly after noon and was at once relayed to Task Force 77, to Admiral Ruble, and to FEAF, with the request that all practicable help be given. But the fast carriers were 300 miles away, and bad weather left behind by Jane prevented flight operations by Badoeng Strait.

          The immediate threat was checked by the fire support ships. Five-inch rapid fire from Toledo and De Haven broke up a tank attack and destroyed enemy artillery, while the destroyer provided further help by vectoring Fifth Air Force aircraft onto useful targets.

[note]

 

 

September 10, 1950

 

 

 

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September 12, 1950

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September 15, 1950

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September 26, 1950

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