Biography

Wright, Edwin Kennedy (Pinky)
[BGen G-3 FEC]

biography

 

biography

Edwin Kennedy Wright

Brigadier General, US Army

TENURE AS DEPUTY DIRECTOR CIA:
20 January 1947–9 March 1949*


BIRTH:

28 December 1898, Portland, Oregon


EDUCATION:

Attended Oregon State College

APPOINTED

20 January 1947 by Director of Central Intelligence, Gen. Hoyt S. Vandenberg; promoted to Brigadier General, US Army, 3 February 1947


EARLIER CAREER:


LATER CAREER:


Died 3 September 1983

* There was no Deputy Director from 10 March 1949 to 7 October 1950. Second in the Agency's chain of command was the Executive: Capt. Walter C. Ford, US Navy, to 1 June 1949; Capt. Clarence L. Winecoff, US Navy, to 7 June 1950; and Lyle T. Shannon (Acting) to 7 October 1950.

biography

G-3_FEC_USA

Far East Command G-3,

Brigadier General Edwin K. “Pinky” Wright

 

 

June 25, 1950

By midnight, 25 June, General Wright in Tokyo had alerted every agency concerned to be ready to put the evacuation plan into effect upon the request of Ambassador Muccio.

September 17, 1950

biography

 

Description: In this photograph, high ranking Department of Army members, Commanding Generals of six Stateside Army Areas, and other field commanders, meet with Secretary of the the Army, Frank Pace and General J. Lawton Collins, Chief of Staff, U.S. Army at the Pentagon. Front row, left to right:
Lieutenant General Maxwell D. Taylor; Lieutenant General Joseph M. Swing; General John R. Hodge; General J. Lawton Collins; Secretary Frank Pace; General John E. Hull; General Edward H. Brooks; Lieutenant General William M. Hoge; Lieutenant General John W. O'Daniel.
Back row, left to right:
Major General Edward T. Williams; Major General William M. Miley; Major General Leland S. Hobbs; Lieutenant General William B. Kean; Lieutenant General George H. Decker; Lieutenant General Horace McBride; Lieutenant General Alexander R. Bolling; Lieutenant General Lyman L. Lemnitzer; Major General Lester J. Whitlock; Major General Edwin K. Wright; and Brigadier General Frederic L. Hayden.
Date: December 02, 1952
Related Collection: Frank Pace Papers
ARC Keywords: Armed forces officers; Cabinet officers; Generals

 

Collins, J. Lawton (Joseph Lawton), 1896-1987;

Hodge, J. R. (John Reed), 1893-1963;

Lemnitzer, Lyman L. (Lyman Louis), 1899-;

Pace, Frank, 1912-1988;

Taylor, Maxwell D. (Maxwell Davenport), 1901-1987;

Brooks, Edward H. (Edward Hale), 1893-1978;

Bolling, A. R. (Alexander Russell), 1895-1964;

Swing, Joseph (Joseph May), 1894-1987;

Decker, George Henry, 1902-1980;

Hobbs, Leland S. (Leland Stanford), 1892-1966;

Kean, William B. (William Benjamin), 1897-1981;

Whitlock, Lester J. (Lester Johnson), 1892-1971;

Williams, E. T. (Edward Thomas), 1901-1973;

O'Daniel, John W. (John Wilson), 1894-1975;

Hayden, Frederic L. (Frederic Lord), 1901-1969;

McBride, Horace L. (Horace Logan), 1894-1962;

Hoge, William M., 1894-1979;

Hull, John Edwin, 1895-1975;

Miley, William M. (William Maynadler), 1897-1997;

Wright, Edwin K. (Edwin Kennedy), 1898-1983

 

 

AWARDS AND CITATIONS

biography

Army Distinguished Service Medal



Awarded for actions during the Korean War

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Army Distinguished Service Medal to Major General Edwin K. Wright, United States Army, for exceptionally meritorious and distinguished service in a position of great responsibility to the Government of the United States in Korea from June 1950 to May 1952.

General Orders: Department of the Army, General Orders No. 54 (May 29, 1952)

Action Date: June 1950 - May 1952

Service: Army

Rank: Major General

biography



Silver Star



Awarded for actions during the Korean War

(UNCONFIRMED - Citation Needed): Edwin K. Wright, United States Army, is reported to have been awarded the Silver Star under the below-listed General Orders for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy in Korea.

General Orders: Headquarters, Far East Command, General Orders No. 36 (1950)

Action Date: Korean War

Service: Army

June 25, 1950 1000

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Brig. Gen. Jared V. Crabb, Deputy Chief of Staff for Far East Air Forces, telephoned Brig. Gen. Edwin K. Wright, Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3, Far East Command, about 1030 and the two compared information.

June 25, 1950 1200

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A message ninety minutes later gave confirmation. General MacArthur immediately informed Washington and, within a few hours, sent the first comprehensive situation report on the Korean fighting. [04-16]

As the news from Korea worsened later that first day, General MacArthur warned Washington officials, "Enemy effort serious in strength and strategic intent and is undisguised act of war subject to United Nations censure." But he hardly realized how strong it was. His situation report showed only three North Korean divisions along the entire border. [04-17]

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American Ambassador to Korea Muccio conferred with President Rhee, who said that the ROK Army would be out of ammunition within ten days. Muccio quickly cabled MacArthur for replenishment.

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The Ambassador had already directed the acting chief of KMAG, Colonel Wright, to request an immediate shipment of ammunition for 105-mm. howitzers, 60-mm. mortars, and .30-caliber carbines. [04-18]

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Before the day was out, [6/25] General MacArthur ordered General Walker to load the USNS Sergeant George D. Keathley (T-APC-117), then in Yokohama Harbor, with 105,000 rounds of 105-mm. ammunition and 265,000 rounds of 81-mm. mortar, 89,000 rounds of 60-mm. mortar, and 2,480,000 rounds of .30-caliber carbine ammunition. He wanted the Keathley to reach Pusan no later than 1 July. He directed FEAF and COMNAVFE to protect the Keathley en route and during cargo discharge. In his information report to the Department of the Army, MacArthur said that he intended

"to supply ROK all needed supplies as long as they show ability to use same." [04-19]

These actions MacArthur took independently. He received no authority from the JCS to supply the ROK until the following day, at 1330, 26 June. {this appears to be incorrect}

June 25, 1950 1200

biography

A message ninety minutes later gave confirmation. General MacArthur immediately informed Washington and, within a few hours, sent the first comprehensive situation report on the Korean fighting. [04-16]

As the news from Korea worsened later that first day, General MacArthur warned Washington officials, "Enemy effort serious in strength and strategic intent and is undisguised act of war subject to United Nations censure." But he hardly realized how strong it was. His situation report showed only three North Korean divisions along the entire border. [04-17]

biography

American Ambassador to Korea Muccio conferred with President Rhee, who said that the ROK Army would be out of ammunition within ten days. Muccio quickly cabled MacArthur for replenishment.

biography

The Ambassador had already directed the acting chief of KMAG, Colonel Wright, to request an immediate shipment of ammunition for 105-mm. howitzers, 60-mm. mortars, and .30-caliber carbines. [04-18]

biography

Before the day was out, [6/25] General MacArthur ordered General Walker to load the USNS Sergeant George D. Keathley (T-APC-117), then in Yokohama Harbor, with 105,000 rounds of 105-mm. ammunition and 265,000 rounds of 81-mm. mortar, 89,000 rounds of 60-mm. mortar, and 2,480,000 rounds of .30-caliber carbine ammunition. He wanted the Keathley to reach Pusan no later than 1 July. He directed FEAF and COMNAVFE to protect the Keathley en route and during cargo discharge. In his information report to the Department of the Army, MacArthur said that he intended

"to supply ROK all needed supplies as long as they show ability to use same." [04-19]

These actions MacArthur took independently. He received no authority from the JCS to supply the ROK until the following day, at 1330, 26 June. {this appears to be incorrect}

June 25, 1950 1500

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Thereafter throughout the day the two men (Ambassador Muccio and ROK President Syngman Rhee's) were in constant communication with each other on the direct line they maintained between their offices. Most of the messages to Tokyo during 25 June came to the U.S. Air Force from Kimp'o Airfield, and there was a constant stream of them. By 1500 in the afternoon both Crabb and Wright were convinced that the North Koreans were engaged in a full-scale invasion of South Korea. [04-2]

June 25, 1950 1700 3AM Washington

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But at 1700 hours the Yaks returned. Two. of them strafed Kimp'o, hitting the control tower, a gasoline dump, and an American Military Air transport Service (MATS) C-54 which was grounded with a damaged wing. Four other Yaks strafed the Sŏul Airfield and damaged seven out of ten trainer airplanes which the ROK Air Force had there.

At approximately 1900 hours six other North Korean fighters again strafed Kimp'o. This time they completely destroyed the hapless MATS transport.#20

American Ambassador to Korea Muccio conferred with President Syngman Rhee, who said that the ROK Army would be out of ammunition within ten days. Muccio quickly cabled MacArthur, for replenishment. The Ambassador had already directed the acting chief of KMAG, Colonel Wright to request an immediate shipment of ammunition for 105-mm. howitzers, 60-mm. mortars, and .30-caliber carbines. [04-18]