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 United Nations Security Council Resolution 83

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Resolution 83
Date: June 27 1950
Meeting no.: 474
Code: S/1511 (Document)
Vote: For: 7 Abs.: 0 Against: 1
Subject: Complaint of aggression upon the Republic of Korea
Result: Adopted
Security Council composition in 1950:
permanent members:
CHN FRA UK USA USSR
non-permanent members:
CUB ECU EGY
IND NOR YUG



The Korean Peninsula
United Nations Security Council Resolution 83, adopted on June 27, 1950, determined that the attack on the Republic of Korea by forces from North Korea constituted a breach of the peace. The Council called for an immediate cessation of hostilities and for the authorities in North Korea to withdraw their armed forces to the 38th parallel. They also noted the report by the United Nations Commission on Korea that stated North Korea's failure to comply with Security Council Resolution 82 and that urgent military measures were required to restore international peace and security.


The Council then recommended that "Members of the United Nations furnish such assistance to the Republic of Korea as may be necessary to repel the armed attack and to restore international peace and security in the area."
The resolution was adopted by seven votes to one against from Yugoslavia. Egypt and India were present but did not participate in voting and the Soviet Union was absent.




Resolution 83 (1950) of 27 June 1950
Publisher UN Security Council
Publication Date 27 June 1950
Citation / Document Symbol S/RES/83 (1950)
Reference 1950 Security Council Resolutions


The Security Council,

Having determined that the armed attack upon the Republic of Korea by forces from North Korea constitutes a breach of the peace,

Having called for an immediate cessation of hostilities,

Having called upon the authorities in North Korea to withdraw forthwith their armed forces to the 38th parallel,

Having noted from the report of the United Nations Commission on Korea1 that the authorities in North Korea have neither ceased hostilities nor withdrawn their armed forces to the 38th parallel, and that urgent military measures are required to restore international peace and security,

Having noted the appeal from the Republic of Korea to the United Nations for immediate and effective steps to secure peace and security,

Recommends that the Members of the United Nations furnish such assistance to the Republic of Korea as may be necessary to repel the armed attack and to restore international peace and security in the area.


Adopted at the 474th meeting
by 7 votes to 1 (Yugoslavia).


1 Official Records of the Security Council, Fifth Year, No. 16, 474th meeting, p. 2 (document S/1507).
2 Two members (Egypt, India) did not participate in the voting; one member (Union of Soviet Socialist Republics) was absent.

June 25, 195

Korean_War

The North Korean invasion of the republic on 25 June 1950 and the inability of South Korean forces to check it prompted an abrupt reversal of the American position. Behind the change was a belief that the invasion was not simply an extension of a local jurisdictional dispute but a break in the wider cold war. Viewing the attack in this light, President Harry S. Truman and his principal advisers concluded that it had to be contested on grounds that inaction would invite further armed aggression, and possibly a third world war.

Korean_War

The immediate American response was to label the invasion as a threat to world peace before the United Nations. This step was not taken primarily to produce troop and materiel support, although such support was forthcoming. The ease and speed with which the North Korean invasion force was driving south made clear that there was not enough time to assemble a broadly based U.N. force.

Only the United States could commit troops in any numbers immediately, these from occupation forces in Japan. Nor were North Korean authorities, who anticipated a quick victory, expected to submit to U.N. political pressure. Rather, the United States sought the moral support of the United Nations and the authority to identify resistance to the North Korean venture with U.N. purposes.

Resolutions adopted by the U.N. Security Council on 25 [Res-82] and 27 [Res-83] June 1950, worded almost exactly as American representatives offered them, gave the sanction and support desired.