Unit Details

ROKA 17th ROK Infantry Regiment

 

  

Division Capital   1st  2nd  3rd  5th  6th 7th  8th
Regiment                
1st             1st  
2nd           2nd    
3rd 3rd              
3rd             3rd  
5th     5th          
7th           7th    
8th 8th              
9th             9th  
10th               10th
11th   11th            
12th   12th            
13th   13th            
15th         15th      
16th     16th          
17th 17th              
18th       18th        
19th           19th    
20th         20th      
21st               21st
22nd       22nd        
23rd       23rd        
25th     25th          

 

17th ROK Infantry Regiment

 

 

Infantry Regiment Organization

CO
1. Paik In Yup  Col. ROKA
2.
XO
1.
2.
S-1 Personnel
1.
2.
S-2 Intelligence
1.
2.
S-3 Plan sand Operations
1.
2.
S-4 Logistics
1.
2.

1st Battalion

CO 
1.
2.
XO
1.
2.
S-1 Personnel
1.
2.
S-2 Intelligence
1.
2.
S-3 Plan sand Operations
1.
2.
S-4 Logistics
1.
2.
A Company
1.
2.
B Company
1.
2.
C Company
1.
2.
D Weapons Company
1.
2.

2nd Battalion

CO 
1.
2.
XO
1.
2.
S-1 Personnel
1.
2.
S-2 Intelligence
1.
2.
S-3 Plan sand Operations
1.
2.
S-4 Logistics
1.
2.
E Company
1.
2.
F Company
1.
2.
G Company
1.
2.
H Weapons Company
1.
2.

3rd Battalion

CO 
1.
2.
XO
1.
2.
S-1 Personnel
1.
2.
S-2 Intelligence
1.
2.
S-3 Plan sand Operations
1.
2.
S-4 Logistics
1.
2.
I Company
1.
2.
K Company
1.
2.
L Company
1.
2.
M Weapons Company
1.
2.

June 25, 1950

The North Korean attack against the Ongjin Peninsula on the west coast, northwest of Sŏul, began about 0400 with a heavy artillery and mortar barrage and small arms fire delivered by the 14th Regiment of the NKPA 6th Division and the BC 3rd Brigade. The ground attack came half an hour later across the Parallel without armored support.

It struck the positions held by a battalion of the ROK 17th Regiment commanded by Col. Paik In Yup.

West of Paik's 1st Division, on the Ongjin peninsula, which juts into the Yellow Sea, a strong NKPA force attacked the lone 17th ROK Regiment, commanded by Paik's younger brother. One ROK battalion was overrun and decimated, but the other two evacuated as planned (the ROKs correctly did not consider the peninsula defensible) on three LST's.

June 25, 1950

The North Korean attack against the Ongjin Peninsula on the west coast, northwest of Sŏul, began about 0400 with a heavy artillery and mortar barrage and small arms fire delivered by the 14th Regiment of the NKPA 6th Division and the BC 3rd Brigade.

The ground attack came half an hour later across the Parallel without armored support. It struck the positions held by a battalion of the ROK 17th Regiment commanded by Col. Paik In Yup.

 

September 1950

The first such major action took place in September 1950 when the ROK 1st Division was attached to the U.S. I Corps. About the same time the ROK 17th Regiment was attached to the U.S. X Corps for the Inch'ŏn landing. Over such attached units the ROK Army Chief of Staff made no attempt to exercise control.

June 25, 1950 0400

At 4 a.m. a tremendous artillery barrage hits the 1st Division of the Republic of Korea Army (ROKA) on the western end and other ROKA outposts along the 38th Parallel that divides North and South Korea. The invasion of South Korea by the North Korean Peoples' Army (NKPA) has begun. The artillery bombardment is quickly followed by ground attacks by the NKPA's 1st and 6th Infantry Divisions against the ROKA 1st Division.

The main effort by the NKPA comes later on the Uijŏngbu Corridor, a pathway to Sŏul, against the ROK 7th Division. The NKPA's 3rd and 4th Divisions and 105th Armored Brigade, supported by about 100 fighter planes, makes the assault.

-- The ROK 17th Infantry Regiment is forced to withdraw from the Ongjin Peninsula, as the NKPA follows with furious attacks all along the 38th Parallel.

-- North Korean forces reach the outer defenses of Sŏul.

-- North Korean radio in P'yŏngyang called the attack a "defensive action" against invading South Korean troops. Russian news outlets follow with stories in the same vein.

-- When the news reaches the United States, most Americans had never heard of Korea, much less know where it is. Throughout the Japanese 35-year occupation Korea, which ended with Japan's defeat in 1945, was called Chosin, and most maps used Japanese names for cities.

But more than 36,000 Americans would die there between June 25, 1950, and July 27, 1953.

Division of the north and south was adopted after being recommended by the Russians, so they could accept surrender of Japanese forces north of the 38th Parallel and Americans would do the same below the line.

American troops are stationed in Korea after World War II, but the last unit was pulled out in 1948. Only a military assistance group headquarters remained. South Koreans were left to create their own armed forces, largely using equipment left behind by U.S. forces.

June 25, 0600

The first message from the vicinity of the Parallel received by the American Advisory Group in Sŏul came by radio about 0600 from five advisers with the ROK 17th Regiment on the Ongjin Peninsula. They reported the regiment was under heavy attack and about to be overrun.

June 25, 0600

Korean_War

 

When Paik began issuing orders, his three regiments were disposed as follows.

The 12th was at the parallel near Kaesŏng, outflanked by the train borne NKPA soldiers and apparently overrun.

The 13th was about fifteen miles east of Kaesŏng [near Korangp'o-ri] and

the 11th was in reserve near Sŏul.

[The 11th Regiment moved rapidly and in good order from Suisak and took position on the left of the 13th Regiment]

Paik ordered the 11th to move rapidly forward to positions behind the Imjin River. For the next two days the 11th and 13th ROK regiments would fight valiantly at the Imjin in a vain attempt to hold back nearly two full NKPA divisions, whose attack was led by a battalion of T-34 Russian tanks.[2-79]

Korean_War

This NKPA attack was powerful and determined, but the main attack came as expected, in the Uijŏngbu Corridor. Two full NKPA divisions, each spearheaded by forty T34 tanks and other mechanized vehicles and supported by 120mm howitzers, hit the ROK 7th Division. The ROKs reeled, recovered, then mounted a surprisingly stout defense.

Korean_War

As planned, Sŏul ordered the 2nd Division to move rapidly forward from Taejŏn to reinforce this critical corridor. But the 2nd could not get there in time. The 7th was forced to give way. It fell back on Uijŏngbu, thereby exposing the right flank of Paik's 1st Division, which was holding along the Imjin River, and forcing Paik to fall back toward Sŏul. [not for two days, I hope]

Korean_War

Farther east, in the hills of mid-Korea, elements of two other NKPA divisions simultaneously struck the ROK 6th Division. As with Paik's 1st, only two regiments were on the line; but as it happened, he had not issued any weekend passes, and these regiments were at full strength. Besides that, the ROK 6th Division had unusually good artillery units. Its forward elements, some fighting from concrete pillboxes, held, giving the commanders time to rush the reserve regiment forward from Wŏnju, forty miles south. The division inflicted harsh casualties on the NKPA regiments and might have held longer, but the collapse of the ROK 7th Division at Uijŏngbu exposed its distant left flank, also forcing it to withdraw.

There were two other subsidiary D day NKPA attacks on the extreme flanks.

Korean_War

West of Paik's 1st Division, on the Ongjin peninsula, which juts into the Yellow Sea, a strong NKPA force attacked the lone 17th ROK Regiment, commanded by Paik's younger brother. One ROK battalion was overrun and decimated, but the other two evacuated as planned (the ROKs correctly did not consider the peninsula defensible) on three LST's.

Korean_War

On the opposite side of Korea, on the mountainous east coast bordering the Sea of Japan, the NKPA simultaneously hit the widely dispersed and under strength ROK 8th Division, both frontally and by multiple amphibious assaults on its coastal flanks. Caught in a well executed land-sea envelopment, the division was powerless to mount an effective defense, and was soon forced to withdraw.

Korean_War

During these well planned and well executed quadruple assaults the NKPA Air Force was out in full force, about 100 planes. Some of the bombers attacked Sŏul and its airport, Kimp'o, causing panic among the civilians. Some of the fighters bombed and strafed ROK Army forces. But the NKPA Air Force's contribution to the battle was slight. Contrary to the predictions of Roberts and Muccio, the ROK soldiers did not panic; they all but ignored the planes. Of far greater menace and effectiveness were the Russian T34 tanks. The NKPA made a mockery of Roberts's judgment that Korea was "not good tank country." The T34s rolled southward, easily and relentlessly, creating terror and panic among most ROK units. But not all. About ninety of Paik's 1st Division troopers died valiantly in suicidal attempts to destroy the tanks with satchel charges and other makeshift explosive devices.

June 25, 1950 0900

Korean_War

The North Korean attack against the Ongjin Peninsula on the west coast, northwest of Sŏul, began about 0400 with a heavy artillery and mortar barrage and small arms fire delivered by the NKPA 14th Regiment of the NKPA 6th Division and the BC 3rd Brigade. The ground attack came half an hour later across the Parallel without armored support. It struck the positions held by a battalion of the ROK 17th Regiment commanded by Col. Paik In Yup. [14]

Korean_War


The first message from the vicinity of the Parallel received by the American Advisory Group in Sŏul came by radio about 0600 from five advisers with the ROK 17th Regiment on the Ongjin Peninsula. They reported the regiment was under heavy attack and about to be overrun. [15]

 

Before 0900 another message came from them requesting air evacuation. Two KMAG aviators, Maj. Lloyd Swink and Lt. Frank Brown, volunteered to fly their L-5 planes from Sŏul. They succeeded in bringing the five Americans out in a single trip. [03-16]

The Ongjin Peninsula, cut off by water from the rest of South Korea, never had been considered defensible in case of a North Korean attack. Before the day ended, plans previously made were executed to evacuate the ROK 17th Regiment. What was left, 2 battalions.