Unit Details

3rd Battalion 9th Infantry Regiment [3/9]

   All Black Unit

  


 

3rd Battalion

Headquarters Company

CO Commanding Officer

Rank Name From To Status
  H. Y. Chase      
  D. M. ("Mac") McMains      
         

XO Executive Officer

Rank Name From To Status
  William H. Frazier, Jr.,      
             

S-1 Personnel

Rank Name From To Status
         
             

S-2 Intelligence

Rank Name From To Status
         
             

S-3 Plan sand Operations

Rank Name From To Status
         
             

S-4 Logistics

Rank Name From To Status
             
             

I Company

I Company

Rank Name From To Status
             
             

K Company

K Company

Rank Name From To Status
             
             

L Company

L Company

Rank Name From To Status
         
         

M Weapons Company

M Weapons Company

Rank Name From To Status
             
             

Medical Detachment

Medical Detachment

Rank Name From To Status
             
             

Transportation Company

Transportation Company

Rank Name From To Status
             
             

 

Unit Info

 

August 8, 1950

The 9th Infantry's black battalion was its 3rd. It was composed of veterans of the deactivated 25th Infantry and other black outfits, plus a large number of postwar volunteers and draftees. Its commander was a capable, combat experienced white, former National Guard officer D. M. ("Mac") McMains, thirty-nine. He had fought in the 112th Cavalry Regiment in the Southwest Pacific, rising to battalion commander and regimental exec. After the war he had returned to civilian life, but in 1948 he went on fulltime active service, first as commander of the 3/9, then a year later (when it was decided all officers of the 3/9 should be black) as exec of the 9th Infantry.

Shortly before the Korean War broke out, McMains was routinely transferred to the Far East. While on leave he suffered severe head and face injuries in an automobile accident which required hospitalization and plastic surgery.

Upon receiving the war alert, Dutch Keiser recalled McMains to resume command of the 3/9 from the black officer who had succeeded him, H. Y. Chase. Notwithstanding his injuries, McMains was pleased to return to command the 3/9, which he had trained well. He and a new combat experienced white exec, William H. Frazier, Jr., forty-two, had supervised its preparations for shipment to Korea and combat.