Unit Details

3rd Battalion, 29th Infantry Regiment
[3bn29thIR]

   Unit Info latter  Unit Info

 

Attached to 19thIR July 24, 1950

Desroyed on July 27, 1950

Attached to the 29thIR xxxx

3rd Battalion, 29th Infantry Regiment
[3bn29thIR]

 

CO 

Rank Name From To Status
Col    Mott        
LtCol      George H. DeChow  8/11/50    

XO

Rank Name From To Status
  Maj     Tony J. Raibl     29Jul50 WIA
             

S-1 Personnel

Rank Name From To Status
             
             

S-2 Intelligence

Rank Name From To Status
         
             

S-3 Plan sand Operations

Rank Name From To Status
             
             

S-4 Logistics

Rank Name From To Status
             
             

I Company

I Company

Rank Name From To Status
  1st Lt. Alexander G. Makarounis           
             

K Company

K Company

Rank Name From To Status
             
             

L Company

L Company

Rank Name From To Status
             
             

M Company

M Weapons Company

Rank Name From To Status
             
             

 

July 27, 1950

American forces finally halted the North Korean advance in a series of engagements in the southern section of the country. Forces of the 3rd Battalion, 29th Infantry Regiment, newly arrived in the country, were wiped out at Hadong in a coordinated ambush by North Korean forces on July 27, opening a pass to the Pusan area.

The Hadong Ambush was an engagement between United States and North Korean forces, occurring on July 27, 1950 in the village of Hadong in southern South Korea, early in the Korean War. The fight ended in a North Korean victory following a successful ambush of US forces which resulted in heavy American casualties.

The US Army's 3rd Battalion, 29th Infantry Regiment, a newly formed unit consisting mostly of inexperienced new arrivals, was ordered to move to the South Korean village of Hadong to hold the pass there from advancing forces of the North Korean People's Army. Unprepared for combat, the American forces walked into an ambush in which most of the battalion's command staff was killed in the pass, leaving lower-ranking soldiers to mount a disorganized defence against North Korean troops occupying prepared positions on higher ground.

For three hours the battalion fought, pinned in a crossfire by North Korean soldiers on higher ground. North Korean forces were able to divide the American force and kill most of its commanders, further disorganizing the men. Following the failed operation, the wounded US commander ordered a withdrawal, which quickly became disorganized, resulting in hundreds of casualties. Destroyed after its first engagement, the 3rd Battalion, 29th Infantry Regiment was disbanded and merged with other units as the North Korean forces advanced through the pass and attacked US positions to the east.

August 2, 1950

In order to reestablish contact with the NKPA 6th Division and possibly to thwart its attack, Michaelis and Moore decided to launch independent probing attacks westerly on the morning of August 2. The plan was that these probes would meet at Much'on, just east of Chinju, where the road to Masan divided.

Moore chose Wesley Wilson's depleted 1/ 29, the stronger of the two Okinawa battalions, to lead his attack; Michaels chose Gilbert Check's 1/27.

Heartened by the presence of five Sherman tanks, Wilson's 1/29 jumped off in high spirits. However, the probe ran straight into an all-out NKPA attack and came to an abrupt halt. The fight that ensued was, in the words of the Army historian, a "disastrous spectacle." ' In the initial encounter one of Wilson's platoons was "almost annihilated" by swarms of ' flanking NKPA infantry.

As the 1/29 fell back in confusion and fear, Moore who was on the scene, committed Robert Rhea's 1/19, then Tom McGrail's 2/19, and finally the other Okinawa battalion, the skeletal 3/ 29. In the chaos of battle the American units inflicted heavy casualties on one another. Adding insult to this injury, FEAF fighters mistakenly strafed the Americans.[7-4]

Meanwhile, on the "south road," Gilbert Check's 1/27, led by six Sherman tanks, probed west toward the fork at Much'on. At  first all went well. There was no sign of the enemy. Michaelis became worried that he had made a fatal error in judgment, that he would be court-martialed for disobeying orders. But near the fork Check's 1/27 ran into the flank of the NKPA 6th Division assaulting the Chicks on the "north road." Boldly and aggressively attacking (with help from FEAF fighters), Check laid into the NKPA truck convoys with heavy fire, forcing the motorized columns to turn about and flee to Chinju. In this important engagement Check and his men destroyed a dozen NKPA vehicles, inflicted heavy casualties on the NKPA, and considerably eased pressure on the Chicks.[7-5]