Unit Details

3rd Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment [3/34]

     3/34     2/21

        Deactivated 8/22/50

Deactivated August 22, 1950 replaced by the 5thRCT, On August 27, Lt. Gen. Walton Walker, U.S. Eighth Army commander in Korea, dissolved the 34th, converting the 1/34th into the 3rd Battalion, 19th Infantry, and the 3/34th into the 2nd Battalion, 21st Infantry.

The 5th Regimental Combat Team (RCT) became the 2nd Division's third regiment. General Church preferred having the 5th fully manned to rebuilding the 34th. He then reassigned the men of the 34th to give his other two regiments their authorized third battalions.

The 34th was reconstituted in Japan and later served again in Korea.

Deactivated August 22, 1950 replaced by the 5thRCT, On August 27, Lt. Gen. Walton Walker, U.S. Eighth Army commander in Korea, dissolved the 34th, converting the 1/34 into the 3/19 ,
and the
3/34 into the 2/21.

The 5th Regimental Combat Team (RCT) became the 2nd Division's third regiment. General Church preferred having the 5th fully manned to rebuilding the 34th. He then reassigned the men of the 34th to give his other two regiments their authorized third battalions.

The 34th was reconstituted in Japan and later served again in Korea.

 

3rd Battalion

Headquarters Company

CO Commanding Officer

Rank Name From To Status
  David Smith pre-war 8Jul50 NBC
   Newton W. Lantron 8Jul50 20Jul50 POW
  Jack E. Smith, 20Jul1950    
         
LtCol Gines Perez 8/6/50    

XO Executive Officer

Rank Name From To Status
         
             

S-1 Personnel

Rank Name From To Status
         
             

S-2 Intelligence

Rank Name From To Status
   Boone Seegers pre-war 07/07/50 KIA
             

S-3 Plan sand Operations

Rank Name From To Status
         
             

S-4 Logistics

Rank Name From To Status
             
             

I Company

I Company

Rank Name From To Status
             
Lt. Joseph E. Hicks   14July50 acting

K Company

K Company

Rank Name From To Status
             
             
13 July 1950
That night the 40 exhausted men of Company K were evacuated to Taejŏn, leaving about 104 men in the remaining two units to carry on the defense.
S2 and S3 to "battle fatigue."

L Company

L Company

Rank Name From To Status
1stLt. Archie L. Stith      
Sgt.  Wallace A. Wagnebreth      
Capt  Douglas W. Syverson 8/6/50

M Weapons Company

M Weapons Company

Rank Name From To Status
             
             

Medical Detachment

Medical Detachment

Rank Name From To Status
             
             

Transportation Company

Transportation Company

Rank Name From To Status
             
             

 

Unit Info

 

At the outbreak of the Korean conflict, the regiment was ordered to Korea and was one of the first units to strike back against the aggressors. Due to a large number of casualties, the regiment was transferred to Japan, and reorganized.

Later, the 3rd Battalion, 34th Infantry would return for a second tour in Korea and remain there until the end of hostilities.

The 3rd Battalion 34th Infantry participated in the following campaigns: UN Defensive, UN Summer-Fall Offensive, and Korea, Summer 1953.

The Battalion was also the recipient of several unit citations to include the Presidential Unit Citation embroidered “Defense of Korea” and two awards of the Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation. Following periods of Reserve and inactive service, the 3rd Battalion 34th Infantry rejoined the active ranks as part of the US Army Training and Doctrine Command and fulfills its mission as a Basic Combat Training unit.

July 8, 1950


Upon Martin's death, Bill Dean wrote, the 3/34 disintegrated and bugged out again, this time in earnest. Its nominal commander, David Smith, was medically evacuated. Many of its officers were killed, wounded, or captured. Among the wounded was Walter P. ("Pinky") Meyer, who had married Lovless's daughter on the day the regiment sailed from Sasebo. The 34th's exec, Pappy Wadlington, temporarily commanding the regiment, placed the senior functioning 3/34 officer, Newton W. Lantron, in command of the battalion's 150 to 175 known survivors.

July 14, 1950

On the 14th, while North Korean mortar and artillery fire fell on the battalion, an estimated 500 soldiers of the NKPA 16th Regiment crossed the Kum River about two miles to the south. Believing his position untenable, the Company L commander, 1st Lt. Archie L. Stith, withdrew his unit around 11 a.m. Stith then left to find the battalion CP, which he finally located 20 miles south of Konju, and reported his decision to the new battalion commander, Major Newton W. Lantron--who summarily relieved him of command and threatened to court-martial him.

July 15, 1950

July 20, 1950

Lantron himself soon "disappeared" from the 3/34 CP in a jeep. He was believed to be dead, but as was discovered much later, he was captured by the North Koreans. When Lantron was declared missing several hours later, Beauchamp named M Company commander Jack E. Smith, who turned twenty-nine that day, to reorganize and lead the remnants of the 3/34.[5-56]  

August 6, 1950

It was late afternoon before McGrails 2/19, supported by the division Recon Company, finally launched an attack. McGrail regained the sector abandoned by Perez's skittish I Company and attempted, without success, to put the I Company back on its position.