Unit Details

35th Fighter-Interceptor Group

USAF Organizations in Korea 1950-1953 Judy G. Endicott http://www.afhra.af.mil/index.asp

 

 

35th Fighter-Interceptor Group


Based at Yokowa, Japan.

Began operations over Korea in July 1950 and moved there in July. 

Redeployed to Japan in August.

Returned to Korea in October and attached to the 6131st Tactical Support Wing, then the 6150th Tactical Support Wing in September, which was redesignated the 35th Fighter-Interceptor Wing in December. After the wing returned to Japan, the group was attached to the 18th Fighter-Bomber Wing in May, before rejoining the wing in Japan.


39tn Fighter-Interceptor Squadron

40th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron


F-80, F-51 (July 1950)


In July 1950, the 35th FIG commenced combat from a base in southwestern Japan. It quickly converted from F-80s back to the rugged and longer-range F-51 Mustangs it had given up only a short time before.

 July 15, 1950

Group headquarters and the 40th FIS moved to Pohang AB on South Korea's eastern coast in mid-July, and

August 1, 1950

 Attached to the 6131st Tactical Support Wing from August 1,

 

August 10, 1950

the 39th Squadron followed on August 10.

 

August 12, 1950

The precarious ground situation in Korea forced the 35th Group to return to Japan only days later, where it remained until early October.

September 6, 1950

Attached then to the 6150th Tactical Support Wing from September 6, it supported UN ground forces moving north of the 38th parallel.

 The 35th FIG focused its attacks on fuel dumps, motorized transport, and enemy troop concentrations until it moved in mid-November to a forward airstrip at Yŏnp'o near the North Korean port city of Hungnam to provide close air support to the U. S. Army X Corps.

When communist Chinese forces surrounded the 1st U.S. Marine Division at the Changjin Reservoir, the group provided close air support to the marines.

December 1950

Relocating to Pusan AB, South Korea in early December 1950, it continued supporting UN ground forces,

March 1951

eventually staging out of Suwŏn in March 1951 and

April 1951

Sŏul Airport in April.

May 7, 1951

The 35th FIG was attached to the 18th FBW, May 7- 24, then

May 25, 1951

rejoined its parent wing in Japan, leaving the 39th FIS behind, first with the 18th FBW and then the 51st FIW.


Combat Components 35th FIG


Stations

  1. Yokota AB, Japan, -July 8, 1950;

  2.  Ashiya AB, Japan, July 8, 1950;

  3. Pohang, South Korea, July 14, 1950;

  4. Tsuiki AB, Japan, August 13, 1950;

  5. Pohang, South Korea, October 3, 1950;

  6. Yŏnp'o, North Korea, November 18, 1950;

  7. Pusan AB, South Korea, c. December 3, 1950-May 25, 1951.


Commanders 35th FIG

 

Witty, Robert Col USAF

  1. Lt. Col. Jack D. Dale, Jr., -February 22, 1951;

  2. Col. William P. McBride, February 22-May 1951.


Campaign Streamers


UN Defensive; UN Offensive; CCF Intervention; First UN Counteroffensive; CCF Spring Offensive.


Decorations


Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation for period September 7, 1950-February 7, 1951.

 

 

35th FIGHTER WING



LINEAGE 35th Fighter Wing established, 10 Aug 1948 Activated, 18 Aug 1948 Redesignated 35th Fighter Interceptor Wing, 20 Jan 1950 Inactivated, 1 Oct 1957 Redesignated 35th Tactical Fighter Wing and activated, 14 Mar 1966 Organized, 8 Apr 1966 Inactivated, 31 Jul 1971 Activated, 1 Oct 1971 Redesignated 35th Tactical Training Wing, 1 Jul 1984 Redesignated 35th Tactical Fighter Wing, 5 Oct 1989 Redesignated 35th Fighter Wing, 1 Oct 1991 Inactivated, 15 Dec 1992 Redesignated 35th Wing, 9 Apr 1993 Activated, 31 May 1993 Inactivated, 1 Oct 1994 Redesignated 35th Fighter Wing and activated, 1 Oct 1994
STATIONS Johnson AB, Japan, 18 Aug 1948 Yokota AB, Japan, 1 Apr 1950 Johnson AB, Japan, 14 Aug 1950 Yonpo, North Korea, 1 Dec 1950 Pusan AB, South Korea, c. 7 Dec 1950 Johnson AB, Japan, 25 May 1951 Yokota AB, Japan, 1 Oct 1954-1 Oct 1957 Da Nang AB, South Vietnam, 8 Apr 1966 Phan Rang AB, South Vietnam, 10 Oct 1966-31 Jul 1971 George AFB, CA, 1 Oct 1971-15 Dec 1992 Keflavik NAS, Iceland, 31 May 1993-1 Oct 1994 Misawa AB, Japan, 1 Oct 1994
DEPLOYED STATIONS

ASSIGNMENTS 314th Air Division, 18 Aug 1948 Fifth Air Force, 1 Mar 1950 314th Air Division, 25 May 1951 Japan Air Defense Force, 1 Mar 1952 Fifth Air Force, 1 Sep 1954 41st Air Division, 1 Mar 1955-1 Oct 1957 Pacific Air Forces, 14 Mar 1966 Seventh Air Force, 8 Apr 1966-31 Jul 1971 Twelfth Air Force, 1 Oct 1971 Tactical Training, George, 1 Oct 1977 831st Air Division, 1 Dec 1980 Twelfth Air Force, 31 Mar 1991-15 Dec 1992 First Air Force 31 May 1993 Eighth Air Force, 1 Oct 1993-1 Oct 1994 Fifth Air Force, 1 Oct 1994


ATTACHMENTS 6102nd Air Base Wing, 1 Jul-1 Oct 1957
WEAPON SYSTEMS F-51, 1948-1950, 1950-1951, 1951-1953 F-61, 1949-1950 F-80, 1949-1950, 1951-1954 F-82, 1949-1950 F-94, 1951-1954 F-86, 1952-1953, 1953-1957 F-86, 1951 RF-80, 1950, 1951-1952, 1953-1954 RF-51, 1952-1953 RC-45, 1952-1954 RT-7, 1952-1953 F-4, 1966 F-100, 1966-1971 B-57, 1966-1969 F-102, 1966 MK-20 (Canberra), 1967-1971 A-37, 1970-1971 F-4, 1971-1992 F-105, 1973-1980 F-15, 1993-1994 HH-60G, 1993-1994 F-16, 1994


COMMANDERS

Col Edgar M. Scattergood Jr., 18 Aug 1948


Col Ray W. Clifton, 7 Sep 1948

Col William O. Moore, 3 Feb 1949

Col Lawrence C. Coddington, 22 Aug 1949

Col Robert W. Witty, 1 Apr 1950

Col Virgil L. Zoller, 10 May 1950

Col Thomas B. Hall, 14 Aug 1950

Col Frederic C. Gray, 1 Dec 1950

Col Brooks A. Lawhon, 18 Feb 1951

Col Strother B. Hardwick Jr., 25 May 1951

Col William A. Schulgen, 28 May 1951

Col Jack S. Jenkins, 19 Jan 1952

Col Thomas J. Barrett, 7 Jun 1952

Col Richard S. Morrison, 19 Jun 1954

Col Fred D. Stevers, 1 Oct 1954

Col Eugene B. Fletcher, 31 Jul 1955

Col James E. Johnston, 15-30 Jun 1957 unkn, 1 Jul-1 Oct 1957 None (not manned), 14 Mar-7 Apr 1966 Col Franklin H. Scott, 8 Apr 1966 Col Allan P. Rankin, 10 May 1966 Col George S. Weart, 10 Oct 1966 Col James A. Wilson, 1 Mar 1967 Col Herndon F. Williams, 1 Feb 1968 Col Frank L. Gailer Jr., 23 Sep 1968 BG Walter Galligan, 9 Aug 1969 Col Walter C. Turnier, 10 Jun 1970 Col Cregg P. Nolan Jr., 1 Jan-c. 31 Jul 1971 Col Fred A. Treyz, 1 Oct 1971 Col William J. Holton, 20 Jul 1972 Col Charles R. Beaver, 24 Aug 1973 Col Richard A. Haggren, 11 Jul 1975 BG Robert W. Clement, 2 Feb 1976 BG Cecil D. Crabb, 9 Aug 1976 (additional duty, 1-20 Oct 1977) Col Dudley J. Foster, 21 Oct 1977 Col Rolland W. Moore Jr., 22 Dec 1978 Col James D. Terry, 17 Jan 1980 Col Gary F. Fredricks, 8 Jan 1982 Col Needham B. Jones, 6 Feb 1984 Col Thomas R. Griffith, 31 Aug 1984 Col E. James Hardenbrook, 28 Aug 1986 Col George K. Muellner, 1 Jul 1988 Col Russell A. Everts, 15 Aug 1989 Col Merrill R. Karp, 8 Jun 1990 Col Robert T. Osterthaler, 25 Sep 1990 Col Merrill R. Karp, 23 Mar 1991 Col Michael D. Anthony, 30 Jun-15 Dec 1992
Col Thomas L. Allen, 31 May 1993 Col Branford J. McAllister, 11 Aug 1993 Col Richard B. Cross Jr., 27 Jul-1 Oct 1994 MG George W. Norwood, 1 Oct 1994 BG Paul V. Hester, 9 Nov 1995 BG Bruce A. Wright, 14 Feb 1997 BG Steven G. Wood, 13 Nov 1998 BG Loyd S. Utterback, 30 May 2000 BG Dana T. Atkins, 19 Jul 2002 Brig Gen William J. Rew, 15 Apr 2004 Brig Gen Salvatore A. Angelella, 26 Aug 2005 Col Terrence J. O'Shaughnessy, Jan 2007 Col Stephen Williams, #2014
HONORS Service Streamers None

Campaign Streamers Korea CCF Intervention First UN Counteroffensive CCF Spring Offensive

Vietnam Vietnam Air Vietnam Air Offensive Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase II Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase III Vietnam Air/Ground Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase IV TET 69/Counteroffensive Vietnam Summer-Fall, 1969 Vietnam Winter-Spring, 1970 Sanctuary Counteroffensive Southwest Monsoon Commando Hunt V Commando Hunt VI

Southwest Asia Defense of Saudi Arabia Liberation and Defense of Kuwait

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers None

Decorations Presidential Unit Citation: Vietnam 10 Oct 1966-10 Apr 1967

Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards with Combat "V" Device 8 Apr-9 Oct 1966; 2 Apr-2 Sep 1967 3 Sep 1967-2 May 1968 1 Oct 1968-13 Apr 1969 14 Apr 1969-13 Apr 1970 1 Dec 1970-25 Jun 1971

Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards 2 Feb 1976-31 Mar 1977 1 Jun 1985-31 May 1987 1 Mar 1990-29 Feb 1992 1 Oct 1994-30 Sep 1995 1 Oct 1995-30 Sep 1996 1 Oct 1997-30 Sep 1999 1 Oct 1999-30 Sep 2001 1 Oct 2001-30 Sep 2003 1 Jul 2004-31 May 2006.

Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation 7 Sep 1950-7 Feb 1951

Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Crosses with Palm 1 Apr 1966-31 Jul 1971 1 Sep 1968-9 Oct 1970 24 Feb-30 Mar 1971

Bestowed Honors Authorized to display honors earned by the 35th Operations Group prior to 18 Aug 1948
Service Streamers None
Campaign Streamers World War II East Indies Air Offensive, Japan China Defensive Papua New Guinea Bismarck Archipelago Western Pacific Leyt
Luzon Ryukyus China Offensive
Decorations Distinguished Unit Citation Papua, 23 Jul 1942-23 Jul 1943

Philippine Presidential Unit Citation
EMBLEM The coat of arms of the 35th Pursuit Group is one of the most striking in the Army. The shield, of ultra marine blue, signifies faithfulness and sincerity of purpose. The gold hand holding a red dagger symbolizes its motto "Attack to Defend" and its readiness to strike for its nation's defense.

The insignia of simple design was produced by Miss Ruby Thompson, daughter of Master Sergeant Benton P. Thompson, Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron, 14th Pursuit Group. Miss Thompson received her idea from Cupid's arrow striking the heart and conceived of the interceptor plane striking its foe.
Approved for 35 Operations Group on 24 Mar 1941 and for 35 Fighter Wing on 16 Dec 1953


EMBLEM SIGNIFICANCE


MOTTO Attack to Defend


NICKNAME


OPERATIONS The 35th Fighter Wing flew air defense missions in Japan, Aug 1948-Nov 1950. In Jul 1950, its tactical group and two squadrons deployed to Korea for combat, but the wing (with one assigned and one attached squadron) continued flying air defense missions in Japan as well as photographic reconnaissance of the Japanese coasts. Wing headquarters moved without personnel or equipment to South Korea on 1 Dec 1950, assuming resources of the 6150th Tactical Support Wing. Flew F-51 aircraft in combat operations, including armed reconnaissance, bomber escort, interdiction, and ground support. Returned to Japan on 25 May 1951 and resumed an air defense mission with some reconnaissance work. The tactical group was non-operational, 15 Jan-14 Jul 1954; during this time the wing directly controlled the 40th, 41st and 339th Squadrons. The group returned to operational status on 15 Jul 1954, and from 14 Aug-30 Sep 1954 was detached from the wing. From 8 Oct 1956 the tactical group was again non-operational, and wing headquarters controlled the tactical squadrons until 1 Jul 1957, when it also became non-operational. From 1 Jul until inactivated on 1 Oct 1957, the wing was a "paper" unit, its units controlled by 41st Air Division. It organized again in Apr 1966 at Da Nang AB, South Vietnam, replacing the 6252d Tactical Fighter Wing and controlled two F-4C
squadrons, two rotational B-57 squadrons, and F-102 flights of the 64th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, conducting combat operations in Southeast Asia. On 1 Oct 1966 the 35th and 366th Wings moved in name only, the 35th Wing replacing the 366th Wing at Phan Rang AB, South Vietnam, and becoming an F-100 organization. The two B-57 squadrons also shifted bases, following the 35th Wing to Phan Rang. Missions included air support of ground forces, interdiction, visual and armed reconnaissance, strike assessment photography, escort, close and direct air support, and rapid reaction alert. It struck enemy bases and supply caches in Parrot's Beak just inside the Cambodian border, Apr-May 1970 and provided close air support and interdiction in support of South Vietnamese operations in Laos and Cambodia, Jan-Jun 1971. Also attached to the wing at Phan Rang was RAAF Squadron No. 2, equipped with MK-20 Canberra bombers, which provided day and night bombing, photo strike assessment, and close air support primarily for 1st Australian Task Force in Phuoc Tuy Province. Another attached component, actually a de facto squadron, was the F-100-equipped Detachment 1, 612th TFS. On 15 Mar 1971, the 612th moved from Japan to Phan Rang in name only, replacing the detachment. It gained an A-37B squadron (8th SOS) in Sep 1970 and began phasing down for inactivation in Apr 1971, standing down from operations on 26 Jun 1971. Its remaining resources passed to the 315th Tactical Airlift Wing on 31 Jul 1971 when the 35th Wing inactivated. A few months later, the 35th Wing activated at George AFB, CA, replacing the 479th Tactical Fighter Wing. It participated in tactical exercises, tests, and operations and provided F-4 aircrew and maintenance personnel replacement training. Gaining F-105 units beginning Jul 1973, in addition to F-4 units, it assumed a "Wild Weasel" (radar detection and suppression) mission and commenced "Wild Weasel" aircrew training in F-105 and F-4 aircraft in late 1975 but lost "Wild Weasel" assets in Mar 1981 to a second tactical wing that activated at George AFB. The 35th redesignated to a tactical training wing on 1 Jul 1984 but retained an air defense augmentation responsibility. It continued to provided operations and maintenance support for the close air support portion of US Army training exercises at the US Army National Training Center, Ft. Irwin, CA, 1981-1990. In addition, the wing advised Air National Guard units on F-4 operations, 1981-1991. With a structure that allowed for a dual-role mission, the wing's mission consisted of both combat and training. It regained the "Wild Weasel" training mission in Sep 1989. The 561st Squadron deployed to the island state of Bahrain to exercise radar suppression, both training and combat operations, in Southwest Asia, Aug 1990 Mar 1991. It also rotated troops and aircraft to the Persian Gulf as part of the on-going US presence in Southwest Asia, beginning Jun 1991 and following with 90-day deployments. The wing began phasing down for inactivation and base closure in mid-1991. Its flying squadrons departed or inactivated by Jul 1992, and the wing remained non-operational until inactivated in Dec. Equipped with F-15C and HH-60G helicopters, the wing replaced Air Forces Iceland at Keflavik NAS in May 1993. It provided air defense and rescue forces until 1 Oct 1994 when it inactivated at Keflavik NAS and activated the same day at Misawa AB, Japan, replacing the 432d Fighter Wing and assuming its personnel and F-16C/D aircraft. The 35th served as host unit for Misawa AB, supporting 33 US associate units and units of the Japanese Air Self Defense Force (JASDF) Northern Air Defense Force. In addition to providing air defense of northern Japan, the wing also deployed aircraft and personnel to Southwest Asia in support of Operations NORTHERN and SOUTHERN WATCH and the Global War on Terrorism from 1997-2003



The 35th Fighter Wing brings a vivid and distinguished history to Misawa Air Base, Japan. It
originally activated at Johnson Air Base, Japan, on Aug. 18, 1948, under the command of Col. Edgar M. Scattergood. The 35th Fighter Wing's original mission was to fly air defense over Japan. Flying F-51 fighters, it carried out this mission until Jan. 20, 1950, when the wing was redesignated the 35th Fighter Interceptor Wing and assigned F-80 aircraft.

In April 1950, the wing moved to Yokota, Japan, where the 35th Fighter Interceptor Group was stationed.

 

KOREA

Three months later, the wing deployed a tactical group and two squadrons to Yonpo, North Korea, and Pusan, South Korea, to support United Nations ground forces during the Korean War. The rest of the wing continued to fly air defense missions over Japan and moved back to Johnson Air Base in August 1950.

 

 



After the Korean War, the 35th Fighter Interceptor Wing added aerial reconnaissance to its air defense mission. It returned to Yokota Air Base, Japan in October 1954 along with the 35th Fighter Interceptor Group, and they served together until they inactivated Oct. 1, 1957. From 1951 until its inactivation the 35th Fighter Interceptor Wing flew several aircraft, including the RC-45, RF-51, F-86 and F-94.

On March 14, 1966, the 35th Fighter Interceptor Wing was redesignated the 35th Tactical Fighter Wing. Two weeks later, it activated at Da Nang Air Base, South Vietnam, to replace the 7252nd Tactical Fighter Wing. While at Da Nang Air Base, the wing had five flying squadrons assigned or attached to it. The 390th and 480th Tactical Fighter Squadrons flew F-4Cs while assigned to the wing. The wing included elements of the 64th Fighter Interceptor Squadron and its F-102 aircraft along with the 8th and 13th Tactical Bomb Squadrons and their B-57 bombers.

In October 1966, the wing transferred to Phan Rang Air Base, Republic of Vietnam, to replace the 366th Wing. With the transfer, the 35th became the parent wing at Phan Rang Air Base and began flying F-100 aircraft with Detachment 1 of the 612th Tactical Fighter Squadron. The 8th and 13th Tactical Bomb Squadrons followed the 35th to Phan Rang Air Base, while the wing gained an attached organization: the Royal Australian Air Force Squadron No. 2 and its MK-20 Canberra bombers.

In September 1970, the wing gained the 8th Special Operations Squadron, which flew A-37B aircraft. On March 15, 1971, the 612th moved from Japan to Phan Rang Air Base to replace the detachment. A month later, the wing began phasing down for inactivation and stood down operations June 26, 1971. The 35th transferred its remaining resources to the 315th Tactical Airlift Wing on July 31, 1971, when it inactivated.

The 35th Tactical Fighter Wing activated at George Air Force Base, Calif., on Oct. 1, 1971, where it replaced the 479th Tactical Fighter Wing. Once at George, the wing took over the mission of training F-4 flight crews. With the arrival of F-105 aircraft in July 1973, the wing began training aircrews for radar detection and suppression or "Wild Weasel" missions in addition to other F-4 training. By 1975, with the arrival of new F-4C aircraft, the wing was training aircrews exclusively in Wild Weasel operations for deployment to operational units in Okinawa and Germany. In 1978, the wing received the new F-4G and its advanced Wild Weasel system. By July 1980, the last F-105G left George Air Force Base, leaving the 35th with F-4s in its inventory.

Operations at George Air Force Base were reorganized by mission requirements March 30, 1981. The 35th Tactical Fighter Wing retained control of the 20th and 21st Tactical Fighter Training Squadrons and gained the 39th Tactical Fighter Squadron. The new 37th Tactical Fighter Wing assumed the 561st and 562nd Tactical Fighter Squadrons active Wild Weasel missions. With the inactivation of the 39th Tactical Fighter Squadron in 1985, the 35th Tactical Fighter Wing was redesignated the 35th Tactical Training Wing. However, the wing kept its air defense augmentation responsibility. It provided operations and maintenance support for the close air support portion of Army training exercises conducted at the U.S. Army National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif., from 1981 to 1990. Also, the wing advised specific Air National Guard units on F-4 operations from 1981 to 1991.

Operations at George Air Force Base were reorganized again Oct. 5, 1989. The 37th Tactical Fighter Wing and the 35th Tactical Training Wing consolidated all operations under the newly redesignated 35th Tactical Fighter Wing. Under the reorganization the 35th gained control of the 561st Tactical Fighter Squadron and the 562nd Tactical Fighter Training Squadron.

In August 1990, the 35th Tactical Fighter Wing mobilized in support of Operation Desert Shield. On Aug. 16, 1990, 24 F-4Gs of the 561st Tactical Fighter Squadron left George Air Force Base enroute to Shaikh Isa Air Base, Bahrain. Once in the Middle East, its deployed people established operational, maintenance and living facilities for the 35th Tactical Fighter Wing (Provisional). These facilities eventually housed more than 60 active duty and Air National Guard F-4s and more than 2,600 military members.

During Operation Desert Storm, which started Jan. 17, 1991, the 561st Tactical Fighter Squadron flew 1,182 combat sorties for a total of 4,393.5 hours. The 35th Tactical Fighter Wing (Provisional) was credited with flying 3,072 combat missions for 10,318.5 hours. U.S. Central Command relied heavily on the wing's Wild Weasels to suppress enemy air defense systems. The F-4G aircrews were credited with firing 905 missiles at Iraqi targets, while the RF-4C aircrews shot more than 300,000 feet of vital reconnaissance film. During operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, the 35th Tactical Fighter Wing (Provisional) suffered no casualties. The wing's people began returning to George Air Force Base March 23, 1991, with its aircraft and pilots following three days later.

The 35th became the host unit for George Air Force Base when the 831st Air Division there inactivated March 31, 1991. As a result, the wing gained several support agencies, including the 35th Combat Support Group and associated squadrons. In support of the Air Force's force reduction programs, the 21st Tactical Fighter Training Squadron inactivated June 28, 1991. That October, as part of the Air Force's reorganization plan, the 35th Tactical Fighter Wing was redesignated the 35th Fighter Wing. A month later, the wing's tactical fighter squadrons were redesignated fighter squadrons.

In 1992, the 35th began downsizing in preparation for the closure of George Air Force Base. On June 5, 1992, the 20th Fighter Squadron moved to Holloman Air Force Base, N.M., and by the end of June, the 561st and 562d Fighter Squadrons inactivated. On Dec. 15, 1992, the 35th Fighter Wing inactivated and George Air Force Base closed bringing an end to 21 years of
continuous service and more than 34 years of total service for the 35th.

Less than six months after its inactivation, the 35th was again called to service. On May 31, 1993, the 35th Fighter Wing was redesignated the 35th Wing and activated at Naval Air Station Keflavik, Iceland. The 35th replaced Air Forces Iceland, which had served as a wing equivalent for more than 40 years. It's new mission was to deter aggression, stabilize the North Atlantic region and protect the sovereign airspace of Iceland through the use of combat capable surveillance, air superiority and rescue forces.

The wing's 57th Fighter Squadron protected the northern airspace with its F-15C/D fighters. Its surveillance mission was handled by the 932nd Air Control Squadron through the Iceland Regional Operations Control Center and four remote radar sites located on the four corners of the island. The 56th Rescue Squadron's four HH-60G helicopters flew combat rescue and reaction force insertion missions.

The 35th Wing inactivated at NAS Keflavik, Iceland, on Sept. 30, 1994. The following day, it activated as the 35th Fighter Wing at Misawa Air Base, where the wing assumed the missions and responsibilities previously performed here by the 432nd Fighter Wing.

Note: In 1948, the Air Force transitioned to a wing organization concept in which numbered fighter or combat groups were placed under the command of a wing. Combat groups eventually inactivated and replaced by squadrons. In 1954, a committee appointed by Headquarters Air Force decided to retain the history and identity of combat groups as separate and distinct from those of the wings which replaced them. However, the committee also decided the honors of the combat groups should be bestowed upon the present day wing that carries the same numerical designation. As a result, when the 35th Fighter Wing activated, it carried the honors of the 35th Fighter Group. With the advent of objective wings in 1991, combat groups were redesignated and activated as operations groups. While the operations groups inherited the complete lineage and honors of their parent combat groups, wings were authorized to continue displaying the honors earned by the combat groups prior to the wing's activation.

The 35th Tactical Fighter Wing activated at Phan Rang AB, RSVN, and replaced the 366th TFW in controlling the 352nd TFS, 614th TFS and 615th TFS, which flew the camouflaged F-100 Super Sabre. Before the wing inactivated on 31 July 1971, it operated the A-37 Dragonfly and the B-57 Canberra. The 35th TFW reactivated on 1 October 1971 at George AFB, California, to replace the inactivating 479th TFW. As the switch of wings took place prior to the common wing tailcode, each squadron had its own individual code: initial units were the 4535th CCTS ('GC'), the 4452nd CCTS GC, blue), the 434th TFS ('GD', light blue) and the 35th OMS ('GE') with the UH-1. The 35th TFW became the major F-4 training wing, and under the AFM66-1 common wing tailcode concept, all the wing squadrons recoded to 'GA'. The 4535th CCTS and 4452nd CCTS inactivated on 1 December 1972, and were replaced by the 20th TFTS and 21st TFTS.

The Wild Weasel role was first assigned to the 35th TFW with the F-105. The 561st TFS, 562nd TFS and the 563rd TFTS were added in 1973, 1974 and 1975, respectively, and the three eventually transitioned to the F-4G as the conversion production line permitted, starting on 28 April 1978. The Weasel squadrons also operated the 'GA' tailcoded F-4E, and by June 1979 the
wing started receding with the 'WW' tailcode, thus becoming a two-tailcode wing, although only two 'GA' tailcoded F-4Gs were noted. Non-Weasel related assets maintained the 'GA' tailcode. The switch to F-4Gs was completed on 12 July 1980.

The 39th TFTS was also assigned in July 1977 with F-4Cs and F-4Cs (Wild Weasel modified), and was later redesignated the 563rd TFS. The 434th TFS redesignated to the 434th TFTS while flying the F-4D and F-4E, and in 1977 the squadron's status changed to non-operational until it was reassigned elsewhere. The Wild Weasel operations of the 561 TFS, 563rd TFS and 562nd TFTS were passed to the co-based 37th TFW on 30 March 1981, and the wing was redesignated the 35th Tactical Training Wing on 1 July 1984. The wing status returned to the 35 TFW designation on 5 October 1989, when F-4E/G Wild Weasel operations were returned from the 37th TFW. The co-based 37th TFW designation was reassigned to cover F-117 operations at Tonopah. The 561st TFS and the 562nd TFTS returned to 35th TFW control with 'WW' codes.

As part of the 20th TFTS, the German Luftwaffe undertook its F-4 training at George AFB. This started with the F-4F in standard Luftwaffe camouflage with USAF markings and codes, and later with special purchased 1975 block F-4Es in full USAF camouflage and markings, all under the designation of the 1st GAFTS.

As part of the USAF's effort in the Gulf War, the 561st TFS deployed as part of the 35th TFW (Provisional) to Sheik Isa AB, Bahrain, in the SAM suppression role. Th 35th TFW was the only wing to follow wartime aircraft painting instructions, and squadron color stripes were removed and the aircraft arrived back in the USA without these, nose art or 'kill' markings.

In 1991 the wing was redesignated the 35th Fighter Wing. This designation was short-lived as George AFB was due for closure in 1993 and the 35th FW inactivated. All components have inactivated or transferred, and the Weasel role has past to ANG units, with Idaho ANG being the first. The 1st GAFTS has moved to Holloman AFB, New Mexico.


At the outbreak of the Korean War, the 35th FIW was flying F-80s on air defense missions from Yokota AB, Japan. Less its group and two squadrons detached for combat in Korea, the wing continued its air defense mission until December 1. It then moved without personnel and equipment (on paper) to Yonpo, North Korea, assuming the resources of the inactivated 6150th Tactical Support Wing. Almost immediately the 35th FIW moved again to Pusan AB, South Korea. On May 25, 1951, it moved without personnel and equipment to Johnson AB, Japan, to resume an air defense mission.


The United States Air Force became a separate and equal service on September 18, 1947. One month earlier, the 35th Fighter Wing (FW) activated under the 314th Air Division in preparation for the move to this new service. As the numerically aligned successor to the 35 FG, the 35 FW carries the bestowed honors of the group’s history and honors.

The following year the new wing added the F-61 Black Widow and a squadron of F-82 Twin Mustangs to its inventory of F-51 Mustangs.

The newly redesignated 35th Fighter-Interceptor Wing (FIW) transitioned into the jet age in April 1950 when it moved to Yokota Air Base under Fifth Air Force and traded in its Mustangs for F-80 Shooting Stars. Two months later, the 35th again met the call to arms.

On June 25, 1950, North Korean forces streamed across the border in a surprise attack against South Korea. Far East Air Forces became involved in the conflict two days later by evacuat-ing civilians from Kimpo and Suwon Airfields. When North Ko-rean aircraft appeared over the fields, 35th pilots met them.

America’s first operational jet fighter, the F-80, surpassed its propeller-driven predecessors in most measures. , those early improvements came at a cost in range and loiter time. As a result, the Air Force brought many of the venerable F-51s out of retirement and pressed them back into service. Because of their recent experience with the Mustang, several members of the wing helped establish a training center at Itazuke AB, Japan, for South Korean aviators. Known as “Bout One,” this small unit of Korean pilots flew their first training mission on June 28 and their first combat missions the following day. That same experience led to the wing’s retrograde to the older Mustang. By July 16, the 40 FS completed its conversion and moved forward to Pohang AB, South Korea. Equipped with only 20 aircraft, the squadron aver-aged 34 sorties each day in a herculean effort to hold the Pusan perimeter. On July 23, the aircraft carrier USS Boxer steamed into Tokyo with 145 additional F-51s, allowing the 40th to reach its full complement of 25. From this delivery the 39th managed to assemble enough aircraft to follow its sister squadron to Po-hang on August 7. From there both squadrons and the operations group focused their efforts on halting the North’s advance down the eastern coast of the peninsula. When possible they provided close air support to ground forces, but the majority of missions were armed reconnaissance focused on interdicting the reinforcements and supplies streaming south.

As the Pusan perimeter continued to shrink, the position at Pohang was fast becoming untenable. Sortie rates soared as air-craft dropped ordnance within sight of the personnel who helped launch them. Maintenance personnel worked on the aircraft by day and defended the base from guerilla attack by night. With the situation worsening the group and both squadrons withdrew to Tsuiki AB, Japan, where they continued combat operations over Korea. On September 15, 1950, United Nations forces flanked the North Korean offensive with an amphibious assault on Inchon. With their supply and reinforcement routes cut, the frontline communist units began to withdraw from the Pusan line. With the tables turned, the allies pushed north allowing the 39 FS to return to Pohang on October 3rd. The 40 FS and the operations group followed four days later. The offensive soon drove the communist forces across the 38th parallel and eventually back towards the Yalu River

On November 16, the wing’s aircraft began moving for-ward by landing at Yonpo Airdrome just south of the port city of Hungnam on the Sea of Japan following missions flown out of Pohang. The last personnel arrived on December 1, 1950 and joined the 77th Squadron of the Royal Australian Air Force, al-ready attached to the wing. While at Yonpo, the 35th saw action in one of the fiercest battles of the war, the battle for the Chosin Reservoir.

Two days after Thanksgiving the Chinese Communist Forces intervened on behalf of North
Korea and launched a surprise offensive against United Nations’ troops. Soon the Tenth Corps found themselves in the legendary battle to break out of the Chosin Reservoir. With Yonpo located immediately south of the escape route, the 35 FIW provided close air support for their Army and Marine Corps brethren on the ground. Again the wing’s position became untenable and Fifth Air Force ordered its withdraw on December 3, 1950.

From its new home at Pusan AB in South Korea the 35th continued to rain destruction on the Chinese Communist Forces as they pushed south below the 38th parallel. In February 1951 alone, the wing’s aircraft expended 12 tons of bombs, 3,400 five-inch rockets, 144,000 gallons of napalm, and 639,000 rounds of .50-caliber ammunition. This firepower inflicted massive destruction on the enemy, destroying or damaging an estimated 1,700 buildings, 127 vehicles, 15 tanks, 21 pack animals, 17 bridges, 36 artillery pieces and 1,300 communist troops.

Eventually UN forces managed to halt the communists’ advance and by April 1951 pushed them back north of the 38th parallel where the battle lines solidified for the remainder of the war. With the disposition of the war changing and additional forces arriving in theater, America’s focus broadened towards ensuring the safety of its allies. Accordingly, the 35 FIW’s wartime involvement came to an end, leaving behind the 39 FS which went on to become one of the leading MiG killing units of the Korean War.

On May 25, 1951, the wing returned to Johnson AB where it again assumed responsibility for the air defense of central Japan. To accomplish this mission, the wing used a wide variety of air-craft and often dispersed them throughout the region. The 339th Fighter Squadron, collocated with the wing, operated the F-80 Shooting Star, but its primary operational platform was the F-94 Starfire. A heavily modified version of the F-80, the F-94 served as America’s first all-weather jet interceptor. The 40th Fighter Squadron, stationed at Misawa AB until July 1951, continued with the F-51 Mustang until 1953 when it again transitioned to jets with the F-80 and F-86 Sabre. The 41st Fighter Squadron likewise upgraded to Sabres in 1953, having operated the F-80 since 1950. Additionally, an assortment of reconnaissance air-craft made it into the wing, including the RF-51, RF-80, RC-45 and RT-7. All of these aircraft found themselves detached from Johnson AB periodically to ensure a response force could meet any potential threat to Japan.

On October 1, 1954, the 35th Fighter-Interceptor Wing moved to Yokota AB, after relinquishing control of the 339 FS in June. At Yokota, it continued to support the air defense mission. In August 1956, the 41 FS moved to Andersen AB, Guam. Still attached to the 35th, it left only one operational squadron in Ja-pan, an indication of things to come. By July 1957 the 35 FIW existed only on paper with no personnel or equipment assigned. Accordingly the wing inactivated on October 1 after almost 15 years of service and two wars in the Pacific.

In 1966 another war in the Pacific Theater pressed the 35th Tactical Fighter Wing (TFW) back into service when it activated on March 14 at Da Nang AB, South Vietnam. The 64th FighterInterceptor Squadron operated F-102 Delta Daggers whose primary mission protected South Vietnam from the unlikely event of an air raid by the North. Two squadrons of F-4C Phantoms, the 390th and 480th Tactical Fighter Squadrons, also joined the wing.

The latter squadrons soon added the 35th to the short list of wings with aerial victories in three
wars. On April 26, 1966, Maj. Paul Gilmore and 1stLt William Smith of the 480th Tactical Fighter Squadron destroyed a MiG-21 in aerial combat, the first such aircraft shot down during Vietnam. The 390th followed a month later by downing a MiG-17, and the 480th destroyed two more MiG-21s in July. These four would be the 35 TFW’s only air-to-air kills of the war as its mission once again changed to a purely air-to-ground focus.

On October 10, 1966, the wing moved to Phan Rang AB, South Vietnam, leaving the F-4C and F-102 units at Da Nang. At Phan Rang the 35 TFW oversaw an odd assortment of aircraft. The B-57s of the 8th and 13th Tactical Bombardment Squadrons moved to the new base where Mk20 Canberras, close cousins to the B-57, from the Royal Australian Air Force’s Number Two Squadron joined them the following year. Together they focused on what was often referred to as “night intruder” missions that interdicted supply routes from the North.

Once at Phan Rang the wing acquired four squadrons of F-100 Super Sabres: the 352nd, 612th, 614th, and 615th Tactical Fighter Squadrons. A fifth squadron, the 120th Tactical Fighter Squadron, joined the others in April 1968 following the USS Pueblo incident. The temporary deployment of this squadron freed an F-4 squadron elsewhere for a show-of-force deployment to the Korean Peninsula. These Super Sabre units provided close air support to ground units in South Vietnam as well as perform-ing interdiction work over Cambodia’s Parrot’s Beak and the Laotian panhandle.

In September 1970, the 8th Tactical Bombardment Squadron switched to the A-37 Dragonfly and became the 8th Special Op-erations Squadron. With the focus turning toward Vietnamization of the war, the 8th trained South Vietnamese airmen in the A-37. On July 31, 1971, the 35th Tactical Fighter Wing again inacti-vated, having added another 13 campaign streamers and a Presi-dential Unit Citation to its organizational flag.

The 35 TFW returned to its birthplace of California and its first stateside assignment since World War II when it activated at George AFB on October 1, 1971. The wing initially activated with four squadrons: the 434th Tactical Fighter Squadron, the 4435th Tactical Fighter Replacement Squadron, and the 4435th and 4452nd Combat Crew Training Squadrons. The wing’s mission initially involved replacement training for aircrews and maintenance personnel.

In July 1973, the 35th's history became intertwined with the Wild Weasel mission. Because of George AFB’s proximity to the range facilities of Nellis AFB, the Air Force relocated the F105G fleet from McConnell AFB, Kansas, to the California desert. The 561st Tactical Fighter Squadron arrived on July 1 and was fol-lowed by the 562nd and 563rd Tactical Fighter Squadrons over the next two years. Together they formed the Air Force’s F-105G and F-4C Wild Weasel schoolhouse with the former serving as the operational unit and the latter two serving as training units. In April 1978, the first F-4G Wild Weasel rolled off the assembly line and arrived at George AFB. The 35 TFW spearheaded the testing and training needed for the eventual Air Force-wide con-version to the newest version of the Surface-to-Air Missile (SAM) hunter.

The 35th Tactical Fighter Wing flew the Republic F-105G Thunderchief in Wild Weasel operations while stationed at George AFB, California, from 1973 to 1980. The Thunderchief became known affectionately as the “Thud” for the sound it made when hitting the ground upon
landing.

In March of 1981, a second wing, the 37 TFW, activated at George AFB and assumed responsibility for fulfilling the Wild Weasel mission. For the next eight years, the 35 TFW returned to training F-4 aircrew and maintainers. In 1989, the 37th moved to Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, to take over F-117 operations. This move placed the Wild Weasel training and operations back under the 35 TFW who would play a significant role in the nation’s next conflict.

On August 2, 1990, Iraq invaded Kuwait. Together, 28 nations formed a coalition determined to free Kuwait from Saddam Hussein’s regime. In the early morning hours of January 17, 1991, the military forces of this coalition launched a massive air campaign, pummeling Iraq with more combat sorties in the first day than Iraq faced during its entire eight-year war with neighboring Iran.

When the air armada assembled for the initial push into Iraq, the 35th Tactical Fighter Wing (Provisional) was ready, having deployed to Shaikh Isa Air Base, Bahrain. In a cleverly designed attack, 37 drone aircraft entered Iraqi airspace as decoys for the main strike packages. The drones also acted as a catalyst, causing Iraq’s air defenses to engage the supposed attackers. This pro-vided a target rich environment for the 28 F-4G Wild Weasels that preceded the initial wave of fighter-bombers into target areas. Another 41 Wild Weasels flew escort missions later that day, launching a combined total of 123 AGM-88 High Speed Anti-Radiation Missiles (HARM) and effectively punching holes in Iraq’s integrated air defense system.

By war’s end, the 35 TFW(P) flew 3,072 sorties, amassed 10,318 hours, launched 918 AGM-88 missiles, and destroyed or suppressed 254 radar sites, effectively shutting down the entire Iraqi air defense network as remaining sites shut down in self-preservation. Of the 37 allied aircraft lost in combat during the war, Iraqi radar guided SAMs only claimed five. Of those, four lacked Wild Weasel protection.

Avionics specialists from the 35th Tactical Fighter Wing (Provisional) work on an F-4G radar in the South Loop area of Shaikh Isa AB, Bahrain during Operation Desert Shield, November 1990. The wing flew 3,072 combat missions and launched 905 missiles at Iraqi air defense sites during Operation Desert Storm.

Just as their predecessors did in three previous conflicts, the warrior mindset of the wing’s men and women guaranteed success. As one story goes, severe weather at Shaikh Isa delayed the departure of a flight of F-4Gs charged with protecting an F-16 strike package destined for a particularly unpleasant part of Iraq. When the Weasels finally received clearance, they were behind schedule and the strike package proceeded without them. Deter-mined to protect their fellow Airmen, the F-4G crews lit their afterburners and overtook the strike package en route to the target. The mission succeeded, but it came with a cost. The high-speed dash used more fuel than originally planned and one of the air-craft failed to rendezvous with a tanker after withdrawing from Iraq. The F-4 crew ejected over Saudi Arabia and the F-16 pilots returned safely to their bases.

The Gulf War became a bittersweet victory for the Weasels as they returned home to shrinking defense budgets. Since the F-4Gs were the last version of the Phantom in the active inventory, the Air Force determined it was no longer financially feasible to keep this relatively small fleet operational. Even the legendary Weasel lair of George AFB faced closure. Redesignated as part of the objective wing reorganization in October 1991, the 35th Fighter Wing began downsizing in preparation for base closure and officially inactivated on December 15, 1992.

In an effort to protect its legacy, the Air Force instituted a heritage scoring system to ensure units with distinguished histo-ries remained active. Out of more than 200 units, the 35th ranked third, ensuring its place among active units (currently ranked second). As a result, the Air Force activated the 35th Wing at Na-val Air Station Keflavik, Iceland, on May 31, 1993, flying air defense missions in the F-15C Eagle. Sixteen months later the 35th Wing inactivated at Keflavik and activated the same day at Mi-sawa Air Base, Japan, as the 35th Fighter Wing. At Misawa AB, the wing resumed its long association with “Wild Weasel” opera-tions. After achieving initial operational capability on F-16CJ aircraft in 1996, the 13th and 14th Fighter Squadrons deployed 12 times in support of operations SOUTHERN and NORTHERN WATCH in Southwest Asia. The wing’s final deployment brought an end to both of these operations.

On December 2, 2002, the 35 FW’s 14th Fighter Squadron “Fightin’ Samurai” deployed to Prince Sultan Air Base, Saudi Arabia, for OSW. Originally scheduled to return home in March 2003, the squadron remained in-place due to increased pressure on Iraq to comply with UN sanctions. When Operation IRAQI FREEDOM began on March 20, 2003, the 14th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron (EFS) flew the first non stealth missions over Baghdad. During the remainder of the deployment, the 14 EFS logged 238 sorties and 1,336 flying hours mainly in SEAD (suppression of en-emy air defense) and DEAD (destruction of enemy air defense) missions. The Samurai employed all of the air-to-ground ordnance in their inventory, including the AGM-65 Maverick, AGM-88 HARM, GPS-guided bomb and cluster munitions, and their 20-millimeter cannon.

The 35 FW deployed again in support of OIF in 2007, this time in a close-air support role. The two squadrons flew a combined total of 2,765 combat sorties and personnel received a total of seven bronze stars, a Distinguished Flying Cross, and the Mac-Kay Trophy for the Air Force’s Most Meritorious Flight of 2007.


The 35th Fighter Wing brings a vivid and distinguished history to Misawa Air Base, Japan. It originally activated at Johnson Air Base, Japan, on Aug. 18, 1948, under the command of Col. Edgar M. Scattergood. The 35th Fighter Wing's original mission was to fly air defense over Japan. Flying F-51 fighters, it carried out this mission until Jan. 20, 1950, when the wing was redesignated the 35th Fighter Interceptor Wing and assigned F-80 aircraft.

In April 1950, the wing moved to Yokota, Japan, where the 35th Fighter Interceptor Group was stationed. Three months later, the wing deployed a tactical group and two squadrons to Yonpo, North Korea, and Pusan, South Korea, to support United Nations ground forces during the Korean War. The rest of the wing continued to fly air defense missions over Japan and moved back to Johnson Air Base in August 1950.

After the Korean War, the 35th Fighter Interceptor Wing added aerial reconnaissance to its air defense mission. It returned to Yokota Air Base, Japan in October 1954 along with the 35th Fighter Interceptor Group, and they served together until they inactivated Oct. 1, 1957. From 1951 until its inactivation the 35th Fighter Interceptor Wing flew several aircraft, including the RC-45, RF-51, F-86 and F-94.

On March 14, 1966, the 35th Fighter Interceptor Wing was redesignated the 35th Tactical Fighter Wing. Two weeks later, it activated at Da Nang Air Base, South Vietnam, to replace the 7252nd Tactical Fighter Wing. While at Da Nang Air Base, the wing had five flying squadrons assigned or attached to it. The 390th and 480th Tactical Fighter Squadrons flew F-4Cs while assigned to the wing. The wing included elements of the 64th Fighter Interceptor Squadron and its F-102 aircraft along with the 8th and 13th Tactical Bomb Squadrons and their B-57 bombers.

In October 1966, the wing transferred to Phan Rang Air Base, Republic of Vietnam, to replace the 366th Wing. With the transfer, the 35th became the parent wing at Phan Rang Air Base and began flying F-100 aircraft with Detachment 1 of the 612th Tactical Fighter Squadron. The 8th and 13th Tactical Bomb Squadrons followed the 35th to Phan Rang Air Base, while the wing gained an attached organization: the Royal Australian Air Force Squadron No. 2 and its MK-20 Canberra bombers.

In September 1970, the wing gained the 8th Special Operations Squadron, which flew A-37B aircraft. On March 15, 1971, the 612th moved from Japan to Phan Rang Air Base to replace the detachment. A month later, the wing began phasing down for inactivation and stood down operations June 26, 1971. The 35th transferred its remaining resources to the 315th Tactical Airlift Wing on July 31, 1971, when it inactivated.

The 35th Tactical Fighter Wing activated at George Air Force Base, Calif., on Oct. 1, 1971, where it replaced the 479th Tactical Fighter Wing. Once at George, the wing took over the mission of training F-4 flight crews. With the arrival of F-105 aircraft in July 1973, the wing began training aircrews for radar detection and suppression or "Wild Weasel" missions in addition to other F-4 training. By 1975, with the arrival of new F-4C aircraft, the wing was training aircrews exclusively in Wild Weasel operations for deployment to operational units in Okinawa and Germany. In 1978, the wing received the new F-4G and its advanced Wild Weasel system. By July 1980, the last F-105G left George Air Force Base, leaving the 35th with F-4s in its inventory.

Operations at George Air Force Base were reorganized by mission requirements March 30, 1981. The 35th Tactical Fighter Wing retained control of the 20th and 21st Tactical Fighter Training Squadrons and gained the 39th Tactical Fighter Squadron. The new 37th Tactical Fighter Wing assumed the 561st and 562nd Tactical Fighter Squadrons active Wild Weasel missions. With the inactivation of the 39th Tactical Fighter Squadron in 1985, the 35th Tactical Fighter Wing was redesignated the 35th Tactical Training Wing. However, the wing kept its air defense augmentation responsibility. It provided operations and maintenance support for the close air support portion of Army training exercises conducted at the U.S. Army National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif., from 1981 to 1990. Also, the wing advised specific Air National Guard
units on F-4 operations from 1981 to 1991.

Operations at George Air Force Base were reorganized again Oct. 5, 1989. The 37th Tactical Fighter Wing and the 35th Tactical Training Wing consolidated all operations under the newly redesignated 35th Tactical Fighter Wing. Under the reorganization the 35th gained control of the 561st Tactical Fighter Squadron and the 562nd Tactical Fighter Training Squadron.

In August 1990, the 35th Tactical Fighter Wing mobilized in support of Operation Desert Shield. On Aug. 16, 1990, 24 F-4Gs of the 561st Tactical Fighter Squadron left George Air Force Base enroute to Shaikh Isa Air Base, Bahrain. Once in the Middle East, its deployed people established operational, maintenance and living facilities for the 35th Tactical Fighter Wing (Provisional). These facilities eventually housed more than 60 active duty and Air National Guard F-4s and more than 2,600 military members.

During Operation Desert Storm, which started Jan. 17, 1991, the 561st Tactical Fighter Squadron flew 1,182 combat sorties for a total of 4,393.5 hours. The 35th Tactical Fighter Wing (Provisional) was credited with flying 3,072 combat missions for 10,318.5 hours. U.S. Central Command relied heavily on the wing's Wild Weasels to suppress enemy air defense systems. The F-4G aircrews were credited with firing 905 missiles at Iraqi targets, while the RF-4C aircrews shot more than 300,000 feet of vital reconnaissance film. During operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, the 35th Tactical Fighter Wing (Provisional) suffered no casualties. The wing's people began returning to George Air Force Base March 23, 1991, with its aircraft and pilots following three days later.

The 35th became the host unit for George Air Force Base when the 831st Air Division there inactivated March 31, 1991. As a result, the wing gained several support agencies, including the 35th Combat Support Group and associated squadrons. In support of the Air Force's force reduction programs, the 21st Tactical Fighter Training Squadron inactivated June 28, 1991. That October, as part of the Air Force's reorganization plan, the 35th Tactical Fighter Wing was redesignated the 35th Fighter Wing. A month later, the wing's tactical fighter squadrons were redesignated fighter squadrons.

In 1992, the 35th began downsizing in preparation for the closure of George Air Force Base. On June 5, 1992, the 20th Fighter Squadron moved to Holloman Air Force Base, N.M., and by the end of June, the 561st and 562d Fighter Squadrons inactivated. On Dec. 15, 1992, the 35th Fighter Wing inactivated and George Air Force Base closed bringing an end to 21 years of continuous service and more than 34 years of total service for the 35th.

Less than six months after its inactivation, the 35th was again called to service. On May 31, 1993, the 35th Fighter Wing was redesignated the 35th Wing and activated at Naval Air Station Keflavik, Iceland. The 35th replaced Air Forces Iceland, which had served as a wing equivalent for more than 40 years. It's new mission was to deter aggression, stabilize the North Atlantic region and protect the sovereign airspace of Iceland through the use of combat capable surveillance, air superiority and rescue forces.

The wing's 57th Fighter Squadron protected the northern airspace with its F-15C/D fighters. Its
surveillance mission was handled by the 932nd Air Control Squadron through the Iceland Regional Operations Control Center and four remote radar sites located on the four corners of the island. The 56th Rescue Squadron's four HH-60G helicopters flew combat rescue and reaction force insertion missions.

The 35th Wing inactivated at NAS Keflavik, Iceland, on Sept. 30, 1994. The following day, it activated as the 35th Fighter Wing at Misawa Air Base, where the wing assumed the missions and responsibilities previously performed here by the 432nd Fighter Wing.

Note: In 1948, the Air Force transitioned to a wing organization concept in which numbered fighter or combat groups were placed under the command of a wing. Combat groups eventually inactivated and replaced by squadrons. In 1954, a committee appointed by Headquarters Air Force decided to retain the history and identity of combat groups as separate and distinct from those of the wings which replaced them. However, the committee also decided the honors of the combat groups should be bestowed upon the present day wing that carries the same numerical designation. As a result, when the 35th Fighter Wing activated, it carried the honors of the 35th Fighter Group. With the advent of objective wings in 1991, combat groups were redesignated and activated as operations groups. While the operations groups inherited the complete lineage and honors of their parent combat groups, wings were authorized to continue displaying the honors earned by the combat groups prior to the wing's activation.














___________________________________________________________________________ Air Force Order of Battle Created: 28 Sep 2010 Updated:

Sources AFHRA