Unit Details

 6147th Tactical Control Squadron (Airborne)

USAF Organizations in Korea 1950-1953 Judy G. Endicott http://www.afhra.af.mil/index.asp

         




6147th Tactical Control Group
Activated in Ch'unchon, Korea, in April 1951 by expanding the 6147th Tactical Control Squadron (Airborne) and directed air strikes in Korea for the duration.

On 13 July the airborne control organization moved back to Taegu, where it became known as the MOSQUITO squadron, an appropriate name which appears to have come from an early radio call sign for the unit. After three weeks of informal existence, the MOSQUITO squadron was officially organized as the 6147th Tactical Control Squadron Airborne, effective on 1 August.


:-:i Forward Air Control Squadron
: ,.:.3;hand 6149th Tactical Control Squadrons (Airborne)
, ,~ :rh Tactical Control Squadron (Ground)
"~ The USAF provided small Tactical Air Control Parties (TACP) to all Army and Marine Corps combat units to coordinate and direct close air support.

 

The 6147th Tactical Control Group originated at Taejon, South Korea, within the "operations section" of the Joint Operations Center - three pilots and two aircraft testing the airborne forward air controller concept.

On July 9, 1950, two airborne controllers flew their first mission in L-17s borrowed from the USA 24th Infantry Division. Despite attacks from enemy aircraft, each controlled about ten flights of F-80s.

The next day, controllers testing T-6s spotted and directed the destruction of seventeen enemy tanks.

The following day the small group of controllers left for Taegu to organize as a squadron. The 6147th Tactical Control Squadron, Airborne, activated effective August 1 to provide target spotting information to tactical aircraft in flight.

 After the UN landings at Inch'ŏn in late September, the squadron (nicknamed "Mosquitoes"), directed air strikes against retreating enemy troops ahead of the advancing UN lines and operated as the eyes of UN ground forces. Squadron controllers also conducted deep penetrations into enemy country, search and rescue, night direction for B-26s, parachute-drop mission coordination, and artillery adjustment.

As the enemy fled, the squadron moved to Kimp'o AB, where the pilots were within minutes of their working areas but also within range of enemy snipers on takeoffs and landings.

By late October, the squadron had moved to Pyongyang but in December retreated to Taegu, where it returned to controlling close air support missions.

In January 1951, the 6147th TCS gained a C-47 that provided an airborne radio relay between the Joint Operations Center and controllers, enabling Mosquitoes to adapt to the changing combat situation.

In April 1951, the 6147th elevated to group-level and organized three squadrons, two of which provided airborne controllers while the third provided the U.S Army with ground tactical air control parties.

 A year later, the group moved to Chunchon, from where it directed interdiction missions. In the closing days of the war, it assisted allied aircraft in crushing a last-minute enemy offensive in the vicinity of the Kŭmsŏng River.

The 6147th TCG earned three Distinguished Unit Citations during the war.


Combat Components


Stations

  1. Taegu AB, South Korea, August 1, 1950;

  2. Kimp'o AB, South Korea October 5, 1950;

  3. Sŏul Afld, South Korea, October 18, 1950;

  4.  Pyongyang East Adrm, North Korea, October 28, 1950;

  5. Taegu AB, South Korea, late November 1950;

  6. P'yŏngt'aek Adrm, South Korea, March 12, 1951;

  7. Chunchon, South Korea, April 18, 1952-.


Commanders

  1. Lt. Col. Merrill M. Carlton, August 1, 1950;

  2. Col. Timothy F. O'Keefe, March 28, 1951;

  3. Col. John C. Watson, c. January 1952;

  4. Col. Paul Fojtik, January 10, 1953-.


Campaign Streamers


UN Defensive; UN Offensive; CCF Intervention; First UN Counteroffensive; CCF Spring Offensive; UN Summer-Fall Offensive; Second Korean Winter; Korea, Summer-Fall 1952; Third Korean Winter; Korea, Summer 1953.


Decorations


Three Distinguished Unit Citations for actions July 9-November 25, 1950, July 9-November 27, 1951, and December 1, 1952-April 30, 1953.


Two Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citations for the periods July 9-November 25, 1950 and October 1, 1952-April 30, 1953.

Heraldry

Azure, a caricatured mosquito wings bendwise Or, cap, gloves, wing- tips and tail Gules, head phone and tail bandage Argent, earpiece and eyes Sable and of the fourth; in chief three aircraft, one and two bend sinisterwise of the last, all within a diminished bordure of the second. Submitted for approval in early 1953 and approved on September 23,
1953.

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Description Two U.S. Air Force North American LT-6G Texan forward air control aircraft (s/n 49-3582, 49-3596) from the 6147th Tactical Control Group over Korea in 1952-53. Both planes were later sold to Turkey.
Date circa 1952(1952)
Source National Museum of the U.S. Air Force photo 100609-F-1234S-034
Author USAF
 
North American LT-6G Texan
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search

6147th Tactical Control Group
Active 19511953
Country United States
Branch United States Air Force
Role Tactical Control
The 6147th Tactical Control Group was a United States Air Force unit that fought in the Korean War. The unit was attached to Far East Air Forces Fifth Air Force

Operational Units:
942nd Forward Air Control Squadron: attached 20 June 1953.
6148th Tactical Control Squadron: 25 April 1951.
6149th Tactical Control Squadron: 25 April 1951.
6150th Tactical Control Squadron: 25 April 1951 20 June 1953.

The 6147th Tactical Control Group originated at Taejon, South Korea, within the "operations section" of the Joint Operations Center three pilots and two aircraft testing the airborne forward air controller concept. On 9 July 1950, two airborne controllers flew their first mission in L-17s borrowed from the USA 24th Infantry Division. Despite attacks from enemy aircraft, each controlled about ten flights of F-80s. The next day, controllers testing T-6s spotted and directed the destruction of seventeen enemy tanks. The following day the small group of controllers left for Taegu to organize as a squadron. The 6147th Tactical Control Squadron, Airborne, activated effective 1 August to provide target spotting information to tactical aircraft in flight.

After the UN landings at Inch'ŏn in late September, the squadron (nicknamed "Mosquitoes"), directed air strikes against retreating enemy troops ahead of the advancing UN lines and operated as the eyes of UN ground forces. Squadron controllers also conducted deep penetrations into enemy country, search and rescue, night direction for B-26s, parachute-drop mission coordination, and artillery adjustment. As the enemy fled, the squadron moved to Kimp'o AB, where the pilots were within minutes of their working areas but also within range of enemy snipers on takeoffs and landings. By late October, the squadron had moved to Pyongyang but in December retreated to Taegu, where it returned to controlling close air support missions. In January 1951, the 6147th TCS gained a C-47 that provided an airborne radio relay between the Joint Operations Center and controllers, enabling Mosquitoes to adapt to the changing combat situation.

Two USAF LT-6G of the 6147th TCG over Korea, 1952.

In April 1951, the 6147th elevated to group-level and organized three squadrons, two of which provided airborne controllers while the third provided the U.S Army with ground tactical air control parties. A year later, the group moved to Chunchon, from where it directed interdiction missions. In the closing days of the war, it assisted allied aircraft in crushing a last-minute enemy offensive in the vicinity of the Kŭmsŏng River. The 6147th TCG earned three Distinguished Unit Citations during the war.

Stations:
Taegu AB, South Korea, (August October 1950)
Kimp'o AB, South Korea (October 1950)
Sŏul Afld, South Korea, (October 1950)
Pyongyang East Adrm, North Korea, (October November 1950)
Taegu AB, South Korea, (November 1950 March 1951)
P'yŏngt'aek Adrm, South Korea, (March 1951 April 1952)
Chunchon, South Korea, (April 1952 July 1953)