Unit Details

USS Juneau (CLAA-119)

NavSource Online: Cruiser Photo Archive

USS JUNEAU (CL/CLAA 119)
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Image courtesy of Al Grazevich


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Flag Hoist/Radio Call Sign: November - Tango - Lima - Papa

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Patch image contributed by Mike Smolinski
CLASS - JUNEAU (Modified ATLANTA)
Displacement 6,000 Tons, Dimensions, 541' 0" (oa) x 53' 2" x 26' 6" (Max)
Armament 16 x 5"/38AA, 16 x 1.1", 16 x 40mm, 8 x 20mm, 8 x 21" tt.
Armor, 3 3/4" Belt, 1 1/4" Turrets, 1 1/4" Deck, 2 1/2" Conning Tower.
Machinery, 75,000 SHP; Geared Turbines, 2 screws
Speed, 32.7 Knots, Crew 675.
Operational and Building Data
Keel laid on 15 SEP 1944 by the Federal Shipbuilding Co., Kearny, NJ
Launched 15 JUL 1945
Commissioned 15 FEB 1946
Reclassified CLAA 96 18 MAR 1949
Decommissioned 23 JUL 1956
Stricken 01 NOV 1959
Fate: Sold for scrap on 29 APR 1960 to Union Metals & Alloys Corp., New York, NY.
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USS Juneau (CL 119) Immediately after launching, 15 July 1945, at the Federal Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, Kearny, New Jersey.

Naval Historical Center Photograph #NH 91929.

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USN_Units 80k Seen shortly after commissioning, as built. USN
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USS Juneau (CLAA 119) Receives ammunition and fuel at Sasebo, Japan, on 6 July 1950. Flagship of Rear Admiral John M. Higgins, Commander, Task Group 96.5, Juneau actively patrolled and bombarded along the Korean east coast from 28 June to 5 July 1950. She was the first U.S. Navy cruiser to see combat action during the Korean War. Note Japanese floating crane alongside.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives #80-G-417996.

National Archives
USN_Units 130k

USS Toledo (CA 133) and USS Juneau (CLAA 119) moored at Naval Operating Base, Yokosuka, Japan, following Korean War operations. Photographed during July-October 1950, possibly in late October, just before Toledo departed Yokosuka to return to the U.S. for overhaul. Note the comparative sizes of these two cruisers.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives #80-G-424598.

National Archives
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024544
163k

United Nations ships assigned to support military operations in Korea pictured at anchor in Sasebo, Japan, during a break in the action. Pictured from front to back: the aircraft transport HMS Unicorn (R72), the light cruiser USS Juneau (CLAA-119), the aircraft carriers USS Valley Forge (CV-45) and USS Leyte (CV-32), and the repair ships USS Hector (AR-7) and USS Jason (ARH-1). The photo was taken in late 1950 or early 1951, as this was the only time that Leyte operated off Korea.

U.S. Navy National Museum of Naval Aviation photo No. 1999.272.030.

Robert Hurst
USN_Units 107k

USS Juneau (CLAA 119) Photographed in the Far East, circa 1950-51.

Naval Historical Center Photograph #NH 52364.

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USS Juneau (CLAA 119) Underway with her crew on deck in "Whites", 1951. Original photo is dated 1 July 1951.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center #NH 96890.

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557k

Forward plan view of USS Juneau (CLAA 119) at Mare Island on 2 November 1951. ARD 32 with USS Charr (SS 328) docked is above Juneau and USS Gurke (DD 783) and USS Rowan (DD 782) are aft ofARD 32.

U.S. Navy Photo #10946-11-51.

Darryl Baker
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0411915
572k

Amidships looking aft plan view of USS Juneau (CLAA 119) at Mare Island on 2 November 1951.

U.S. Navy Photo #10951-11-51.

Darryl Baker
USN_Units 192k

USS Juneau (CLAA 119) Closeup view of her port midships area, looking forward. Taken at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard, California, following overhaul, 26 January 1952. She has been refitted with 3"/50 guns and associated Mark 56 gun directors (mounted alongside the after smokestack). Note details of her stacks, with whip antenna brackets, secondary conning station at lower right, with a Mark 37 gun director above it, and 5"/38 gun loading practice machine between the stacks.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center #NH 96895.

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USN_Units 171k

USS Juneau (CLAA 119) Closeup view of her port midships area, taken at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard, California, following overhaul, 26 January 1952. She has been refitted with 3"/50 guns. Note paravane stowed on deck in the lower left.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center #NH 96894.

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USS Juneau (CLAA 119) Closeup view of her port stern area, looking forward. Taken at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard, California, following overhaul, 26 January 1952. Note newly-installed 3"/50 twin gun mount on her fantail, with its associated Mark 63 director, floater net bins at the railings and inclining experiment tracks mounted temporarily across the ship by her after 5"/38 gun mount.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center #NH 96896.

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0411918
173k Starboard side view identifying numerous antennas while at Mare Island Naval Shipyard in 1951 or early 1952. David Buell
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167k Starboard bow view identifying numerous antennas while at Mare Island Naval Shipyard in 1951 or early 1952. David Buell
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USS Juneau (CLAA 119) Off the Mare Island Naval Shipyard, California, following overhaul, 11 February 1952.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center #NH 96888.

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USS Juneau (CLAA 119) Off the Mare Island Naval Shipyard, California, following overhaul, 11 February 1952.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center #NH 96891.

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USS Juneau (CLAA 119) Off the Mare Island Naval Shipyard, California, following overhaul, 11 February 1952.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center #NH 96892.

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USS Juneau (CLAA 119) At the Mare Island Naval Shipyard, California, following overhaul, 26 January 1952. Note dual paravane downrigger chains at her bow.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center #NH 96893.

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Aft starboard plan view of USS Juneau (CLAA 119) at Mare Island on 26 January 1952. Ships on the opposite side of the pier are USS Onslow (AVP 48) and USS Hollister (DD 788). The antenna of USS Witehurst (DE 634) is in the foreground.

Navy Photo #11651-1-52

Darryl Baker
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0411917
276k

Forward starboard plan view of USS Juneau (CLAA 119) at Mare Island on 26 January 1952. Stacks of the USS Hollister (DD 788) are visible in the background.

Navy Photo #11652-1-52

Darryl Baker
USN_Units 81k Starboard bow view, underway, location unknown, 1954. From the collection of the Naval Record Club. Richard Leonhardt
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516k Med-moored in Genoa, Italy, 1954. Carlo Martinelli

Commanding Officers
Name/Rank Final Rank Dates
Rose, Rufus Edwards, CAPT VADM 02/15/1946 - 10/30/1946
Shea, Daniel Francis Joseph, CAPT   10/30/1946 - 08/18/1947
Fisher, William Gooding, CAPT   08/18/1947 - 08/09/1948
Duvall, William Howard, CAPT   08/09/1948 - 07/29/1949
Sowell, Jesse Clyborn, CAPT   07/29/1949 - 07/25/1950
Kenny, William Talty, CAPT   07/25/1950 - 05/01/1951
McDill, Alexander Stuart, CAPT   05/01/1951 - 03/20/1952
Willcox, George Washington, CAPT   03/20/1952 - 03/21/1953
Allan Jr., Halle Charles, CAPT RADM 03/21/1953 - 04/29/1954
King, George Edward, CAPT   04/29/1954 - 07/23/1955

Juneau II (CL-119)

(CL-119: dp. 6,000; l. 541'6"; 'b. 53'2''; dr. 16'4''; s. 32 k.; cpl. 623; a. 12 5", 2 3-pdrs., 24 40mm., 4 20mm; cl. Juneau)

Capital city of Alaska named after the American pioneer Joe Juneau, who, with his partner Dick Harris, founded a miners camp in 1880 where the city, Juneau, now stands.

II

The second Juneau (CL-119) was laid down by Federal Shipbuilding Co., Kearny, N.J., 15 September 1944; launched 15 July 1945; sponsored by Mrs. B. L. Bartlett; and commissioned 15 February 1946, Captain Rufus E. Rose in command.

Juneau spent her first year of commissioned service in operations along the Atlantic seaboard and Caribbean. Prior to the Korean War, she deployed three times in the Mediterranean. The ship cleared New York 16 April 1947, and joined the 6th Fleet at Trieste 2 May where she aided in stabilizing the unresolved question of territorial ownership between Italy and Yugoslavia. During an extended tour of Greece, she provided ample warning to the communists that aggression would not go unchallenged. The ship returned to Norfolk 15 November for training, and was back on duty with the 6th Fleet from 14 June to 3 October 1948 and again from 3 May to 26 September 1949. As on her first cruise, she ranged the Mediterranean to assure Europeans and Africans of our intention to guard world peace and freedom.

Having been reclassified CLSS-119 on 18 March 1949, Juneau departed Norfolk 29 November for the Pacific. She arrived Bremerton, Wash., 15 January 1950 and took part in operations along the Pacific coast. On 22 April she became flagship for Rear Admiral J. M. Higgins, Commander CruDiv 5, and reported for duty in Yokosuka, Japan, 1 June where she began surveillance patrols in the Tsushima Straits. When the Korean War broke out on 25 June,Juneau was one of the few ships immediately available to Vice Admiral C. Turner Joy, Commander of Naval Forces, Far East. She patrolled south of the 38th parallel to prevent enemy landings, conducted the first shore bombardments 29 June at Bokuko Ko, destroyed enemy shore installations, engaged in the first naval action 2 July when she sank three enemy torpedo boats near Chumonchin Chan, and supported raiding parties along the coast. On 18 July Juneau's force, which included British units, laid down a deadly barrage on enemy troop concentrations near Yongdok which slowed down the North Korean advance southward.

The ship departed Sasebo Harbor 28 July and made a sweep through Formosa Straits before reporting for duty with the 7th Fleet at Buckner Bay, Okinawa, 2 August. She became flagship of the Formosa Patrol Force 4 August, remaining until 29 October when she joined the Fast Carrier Task Force operating off the east coast of Korea. The ship conducted daily plane guard for the attack carriers, and returned to Long Beach, Calif., 1 May 1951 for overhaul and a period of operations off the Pacific coast and in Hawaii. She returned to Yokosuka 19 April 1952 and conducted strikes along the Korean coast in coordination with carrier planes until returning to Long Beach 5 November.

Juneau engaged in training maneuvers and operations until 7 April 1953 when she arrived Norfolk to rejoin the Atlantic Fleet. On 13 May the cruiser departed for duty with the 6th Fleet once again, and returned home 23 October. She operated in the Atlantic and Caribbean until 18 November 1954, then returned to the Mediterranean for her last tour of duty. After her return to the East Coast 23 February 1955. she was placed in reserve at Philadelphia 23 March 1956, and remained inactive until decommissioned 23 July 1956. The ship was then attached to the Philadelphia Group of the Atlantic Reserve Fleet until 1 November 1959 when she was struck from the Navy List. Juneau was sold for scrapping to Union Metals & Alloys Corp., New York, in 1962.

Juneau received five battle stars for Korean War service.

Published:Fri Jul 24 07:16:50 EDT 2015

USS_Juneau_(CLAA-119)

 

 

 


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Career

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Name: USS Juneau
Builder: Federal Shipbuilding Co., Kearny, New Jersey
Laid down: 15 September 1944
Launched: 15 July 1945
Commissioned: 15 February 1946
Decommissioned: 23 July 1955


Reclassified: CLAA-96, 18 March 1949
Struck: 1 November 1959


Honors and
awards: 5 battle stars (Korea)


Fate: Sold for scrapping, 1962
General characteristics
Class and type: Juneau-class cruiser
Displacement: 6,000 long tons (6,096 t)
Length: 541 ft 6 in (165.05 m)
Beam: 53 ft 2 in (16.21 m)
Draft: 16 ft 4 in (4.98 m)
Speed: 32 kn (37 mph; 59 km/h)
Complement: 623 officers and enlisted
Armament: • 12 × 5 in (127 mm)/38 cal guns
• 2 × 3-pounder guns
• 24 × 40 mm guns
• 4 × Oerlikon 20 mm cannons


The second USS Juneau (CL-119) was the lead ship of the United States Navy Juneau-class light cruiser laid down by the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company in Kearny, New Jersey on 15 September 1944; launched on 15 July 1945; sponsored by Mrs. B. L. Bartlett; and commissioned 15 February 1946, Captain Rufus E. Rose in command.


Contents


[hide]
1 Service history
1.1 Mediterranean, 1946-1949
1.2 Korean War, 1950-1952
1.3 Atlantic, 1953-1955
2 Decommissioning and sale
3 Awards
4 References
5 External links


Service history


Mediterranean, 1946-1949
Juneau spent her first year of commissioned service in operations along the Atlantic seaboard and Caribbean. Prior to the Korean War, she deployed three times in the Mediterranean. The ship cleared New York on 16 April 1947, and joined the 6th Fleet at Trieste on 2 May where she aided in stabilizing the unresolved question of territorial ownership between Italy and Yugoslavia. During an extended tour of Greece, she provided ample warning to the communists that aggression would not go unchallenged. The ship returned to Norfolk on 15 November for training, and was back on duty with the 6th Fleet from 14 June-3 October 1948 and again from 3 May-26 September 1949. Having been reclassified CLAA-119 on 18 March 1949, Juneau departed Norfolk on 29 November for the Pacific.


Korean War, 1950-1952


She arrived at Bremerton, Washington on 15 January 1950 and took part in operations along the Pacific coast. On 22 April, she became flagship for Rear Admiral J. M. Higgins, Commander Cruiser Division 5 (CruDiv 5), and reported for duty in Yokosuka, Japan on 1 June, where she began surveillance patrols in the Tsushima Straits.

When the Korean War broke out on 25 June, Juneau was one of the few ships immediately available to Vice Admiral C. Turner Joy, Commander of Naval Forces, Far East.

She patrolled south of the 38th parallel to prevent enemy landings, conducted the first shore bombardments on 29 June at Bokuko Ko, destroyed enemy shore installations,

engaged in the first naval action on 2 July when she sank three enemy torpedo boats near Chumonchin Chan, and supported raiding parties along the coast.

On 18 July, Juneau's force, which included British units such as the Royal Navy light cruiser HMS Belfast,[1] laid down a deadly barrage on enemy troop concentrations near Yŏngdök which slowed down the North Korean advance southward.


The ship departed Sasebo Harbor on 28 July and made a sweep through the Formosa Straits before reporting for duty with the 7th Fleet at Buckner Bay, Okinawa on 2 August.

She became flagship of the Formosa Patrol Force on 4 August, remaining until 29 October when she joined the Fast Carrier Task Force operating off the east coast of Korea.

 The ship conducted daily plane guard for the attack carriers, and returned to Long Beach, California on 1 May 1951 for overhaul and a period of operations off the Pacific coast and in Hawaii.

She returned to Yokosuka on 19 April 1952 and conducted strikes along the Korean coast in coordination with carrier planes until returning to Long Beach on 5 November.


Atlantic, 1953-1955
Juneau engaged in training maneuvers and operations until 7 April 1953 when she arrived Norfolk to rejoin the Atlantic Fleet. On 13 May the cruiser departed for duty with the 6th Fleet once again, and returned home on 23 October. She operated in the Atlantic and Caribbean until 18 November 1954, then returned to the Mediterranean for her last tour of duty.


Decommissioning and sale
After her return to the East Coast on 23 February 1955, she was placed in reserve at Philadelphia on 23 March 1955, and remained inactive until decommissioned on 23 July 1955. The ship was then attached to the Philadelphia Group of the Atlantic Reserve Fleet until 1 November 1959, when she was struck from the Naval Vessel Register. Juneau was sold for scrapping to the Union Minerals and Alloys Corporation, New York in 1962.
Awards
Juneau received five battle stars for Korean War service.
References
^ Wingate, John (2004). In Trust for the Nation: HMS Belfast 1939-1972. London: Imperial War Museum. p. 81. ISBN 1-901623-72-6.
This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. The entry can be found here.

June 25, 1950

In June 1950, slightly more than one-third of the United States naval operating forces were in the Pacific under the command of Admiral Arthur W. Radford. Only about one-fifth of this was in Far Eastern waters.

Vice Adm. Charles Turner Joy commanded U.S. Naval Forces, Far East. The naval strength of the Far East Command when the Korean War started comprised

1 cruiser, the USS Juneau (CLAA-119);

4 destroyers, the USS Mansfield (DD-728), USS De Haven (DD-727), USS Collett (DD-730), and USS Lyman K. Swenson (DD-729);

and a number of amphibious and cargo-type vessel