Unit Deails

USS Rochester (CA-124)

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USS ROCHESTER (CA 124)


USN_Units USN_Units USN_Units USN_Units
Flag Hoist/Radio Call Sign: November - Tango - Echo - Zulu
Voice Call Sign: Titanic

CLASS - OREGON CITY
Displacement 13,700 Tons, Dimensions, 674' 11" (oa) x 70' 10" x 26' 6" (Max)
Armament 9 x 8"/55, 12 x 5"/38AA, 48 x 40mm, 24 x 20mm, 4 Aircraft
Armor, 6" Belt, 8" Turrets, 2 1/2" Deck, 6" Conning Tower.
Machinery, 120,000 SHP; G. E. Geared Turbines, 4 screws
Speed, 33 Knots, Crew 2000.
Keel laid on 29 MAY 1944 by the Bethlehem Steel Co., Quincy, MA
Launched 28 AUG 1945
Commissioned 20 DEC 1946
Decommissioned 15 AUG 1961
Stricken 01 OCT 1973
Fate: Sold for scrap to sold to Zidell Explorations, Portland, Oregon on 24 SEP 1974
USN_Units

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Size Image Description Contributed
By And/Or Copyright
USN_Units 65k Undated photo. USN
USN_Units 160 Undated, Excellent overhead showing deck layout and details. USN
USN_Units 30k Undated, seen here in the "broadside perspective" The single stack sets this class apart from the Baltimore's with just a glance. USN
USN_Units 30k Undated. John San Marco
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0412417
73k Port side view, date and location unknown.U.S. Navy location. David Buell
USN_Units 85k December 19, 1946 image showing the ship as completed. She was commissioned the next day. USN
USN_Units 97k USS Rochester (CA 124) Photographed in Boston Harbor, Massachusetts, 19 December 1946, the day before her commissioning ceremonies. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center #NH 96882. USNHC
USN_Units 101k USS Rochester (CA 124) Photograph dated 27 June 1950. However, radar antenna on foremast is of a type that was replaced prior to the ship's 1950 Western Pacific deployment, indicating that this view was taken during the later 1940s. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center #NH 96883. USNHC
USN_Units USS Valley Forge (CV 45) (left) and USS Philippine Sea (CV 47) (center) at their anchorages at Sasebo, Japan, during Korean War resupply activities, 23 August 1950. The ship in the right distance is USS Rochester (CA 124). Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives # 80-G-418734. National Archives
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0412424
72k Starboard side forward, Yokosuka, Japan, late 1951. Don Garner
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0412425
78k Starboard side forward, Yokosuka, Japan, late 1951. Don Garner
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0412426
147k Starboard side forward, Yokosuka, Japan, late 1951. Don Garner
USN_Units 99k USS Rochester (CA 124) Photographed in 1951-53, prior to her May-September 1953 overhaul. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center #NH 96885. USNHC
USN_Units 31k February of 1952 at the naval base in Yokosuka, Japan. RM3 Don Garner
USN_Units 106k USS Rochester (CA 124) En route to the Shimonoseki Strait, Japan, after operations off the east coast of Korea. Probably taken during her December 1952 -- March 1953 Korean War combat tour. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center #NH 96884. USNHC
USN_Units 99k USS Rochester (CA 124) Departing the Mare Island Naval Shipyard, California, 20 September 1953, following overhaul. She has been fitted with 3"/50 twin automatic gun mounts, replacing the 40mm guns she carried from 1946 to 1953. Tugs USS Dekaury (YTB-178) --at left-- and USS Awatobi (YTB-264) -- alongside her starboard side, forward-- are assisting her. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center #NH 84584. USNHC
USN_Units 130k USS Rochester (CA 124) En route to Saigon, Vietnam, 17 February 1954. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph #NH 74136. USNHC
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0412415
71k Bow on view of USS Rochester (CA 124) arriving at Mare Island with the assistance of the tug USS Ossahinta (YTB 278) in September 1954 to assist in celebrating Mare Island's Centennial on 17-19 September 1954.Mare Island Naval Shipyard photo #23881-12-54 Darryl Baker
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0412416
86k Port bow view of USS Rochester (CA-124) arriving at Mare Island with the assistance of the tug USS Ossahinta (YTB 278) in September 1954 to assist in celebrating Mare Island's Centennial on 17-19 September 1954.Mare Island Naval Shipyard photo #23886-12-54 Darryl Baker
USN_Units 165k August 1956, moving into refueling station alongside the Fleet Oiler USS Kawishiwi (AO 146). Dale C. Haskin
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0412423
207k Port side view while underway in June 1957, location unknown.

Credit is Commander Cruiser-Destroyer Force, Pacific Fleet.U.S. Navy Photo
David Buell
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0412422
166k USS Rochester (CA 124) firing a gun salute as she enters San Francisco Bay. This photo was taken
from the south tower of the Golden Gate Bridge. Photo credit is Associated Press.

Photo caption: "SAN FRANCISCO, June 13-A SALUTE FROM THE NAVY-Puffs of smoke drift in breeze from guns amidships on the heavy cruiser USS Rochester in 15-gun salute to ranking services officer in the San Francisco Bay area today as she passes through the Golden Gate and under the Golden Gate Bridge in prelude to first formal fleet review here since 1938. Other units of the U.S. Navy's First Fleet, about 44 ships in all, were scheduled to enter the Bay Area on a four day visit. Background upper left is Fort Baker. (AP Wirephoto)(tdi151127ekb)1957"
David Buell
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0412413
1683k USS Rochester (CA 124) Underway in San Francisco Bay, California, at the time of Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz' review of the First Fleet, 13 June 1957.Photo taken by Allied Photographers of San Francisco. Robert M. Cieri
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0412418
60k USS Rochester (CA 124) South Pacific, approaching USS Virgo (AKA 20) for replenishment, 1957.From the collection of LTjg. Bernard Schenck, USS Virgo 1957. Marc Schenck
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0412419
56k USS Rochester (CA 124) South Pacific, approaching USS Virgo (AKA 20) for replenishment, 1957.From the collection of LTjg. Bernard Schenck, USS Virgo 1957. Marc Schenck
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0412420
39k USS Rochester (CA 124) South Pacific, alongside USS Virgo (AKA 20) with helos available for rescue, 1957.From the collection of LTjg. Bernard Schenck, USS Virgo 1957. Marc Schenck
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0412421
77k USS Rochester (CA 124) South Pacific, hi-line transfer with USS Virgo (AKA 20), 1957.From the collection of LTjg. Bernard Schenck, USS Virgo 1957. Marc Schenck

Commanding Officers
Name/Rank Final Rank Dates
Guthrie, Harry Aloysius, CAPT RADM 12/20/1946 - 05/03/1947
Junker, Alexander Foster, CAPT 05/03/1947 - 02/24/1948
Crosby, Gordon Josiah, CAPT 02/24/1948 - 12/16/1948
Worthington, Joseph Muse, CAPT RADM 12/16/1948 - 12/21/1949
Duke, Irving Terrill, CAPT VADM 12/21/1949 - 03/29/1950
Woodyard, Edward Lender, CAPT RADM 03/29/1950 - 02/19/1951
Smith, Rodman Davis, CAPT 02/19/1951 - 01/28/1952
Chillingsworth Jr., Charles Frederick, CAPT 01/28/1952 - 09/26/1952
Phillips, Richard Helsden, CAPT RADM 09/29/1952 - 10/18/1953
Quinn, John, CAPT RADM 10/18/1953 - 02/04/1955
Wilbourne, William Wilkerson, CAPT 02/04/1955 - 01/10/1956
Gentry, Kenneth McLoud, CAPT 01/10/1956 - 11/05/1956
Webster, John Alden, CAPT 11/05/1956 - 01/10/1958
Coye Jr., John Starr, CAPT RADM 01/10/1958 - 01/02/1959
Ward, Robert Elwin McCraner, CAPT RADM 01/02/1959 - 10/01/1959
Hathaway, Amos Townsend, CAPT 10/01/1959 - 11/01/1960
Shepard, Richard Daniels, CAPT 11/01/1960 - 06/01/1961
Symonds, CAPT 06/01/1961 - 08/10/1961
(Courtesy of Wolfgang Hechler & Ron Reeves - Photos courtesy of Bill Gonyo)
USS ROCHESTER (CA 124) History
View This Vessels DANFS History Entry on the U.S. Navy Historical Center website.

 

Rochester III (CA-124)

(CA-124: displacement 13,700; length 674-11-; beam 70-10-; draft 20-7-; speed 33 knots; complement 1,142; armament 9 8-, 12 5-, 48 40mm., 20 20mm., 4 aircraft; class Oregon City)

A manufacturing city and port in Monroe County, N.Y., located on the shore of Lake Ontario.

III

The third Rochester (CA-124) was laid down 29 May 1944 by Bethlehem Steel Co., Quincy, Mass.; launched 28 August 1945; sponsored by Mrs. M. Herbert Eisenhart, wife of the president of Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., Rochester, N.Y.; and commissioned 20 December 1946 at the Boston Navy Yard, Capt. Harry A. Guthrie in command.

Rochester departed Provincetown, Mass., 22 February 1947 for shakedown out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. By the end of April, she was at Philadelphia, ready to commence nine extended naval reserve training cruises which took her north to Casco Bay and south to the Caribbean.

Upon completion of her ninth reserve training cruise in the second week of January 1948, Rochester prepared for Mediterranean service. Departing Philadelphia 20 February, she arrived at Gibraltar 1 March, and became flagship for Adm. Forrest Sherman, Commander, 6th Fleet. In addition to calling at several ports, the cruiser waited out the events of the Palestinian crisis, at Suda Bay on the northern coast of Crete. She completed her tour June 14th; Admiral Sherman shifted his flag to light cruiser Fargo (CL-106), and Rochester departed for Philadelphia the 15th, arriving 27 June. Rochester then resumed reserve training duty, making cruises to Bermuda, to New Brunswick, and to Jamaica.

After shore bombardment exercises at Bloodsworth Island in early October, Rochester reported to the South Boston Naval Shipyard for her first overhaul which included removal of her catapults and conversion of her aviation section from seaplanes to helicopters. She operated in the Caribbean and along the North Atlantic coast until she stood out from Narragansett Bay on 5 January 1950 and steamed for the west coast, and a new homeport, Long Beach, Calif.

In April 1950, Rochester departed Long Beach for the South Pacific. After calling at Pearl Harbor, she embarked Adm. Arthur W. Radford, Commander-in Chief, Pacific Fleet, for a tour of the U.S. Trust Territories. Upon completion of this tour, Vice Adm. A. D. Struble, Commander, 7th Fleet, was received on board at Guam. Rochester then set course for the Philippine Islands.

KOREA

She was at Sangley Point, Philippine Islands, when President Truman ordered the 7th Fleet into action, and was operating with Carrier Task Force 77 on the morning of 3 July 1950 when the first U.N. air raids against North Korean forces were launched. On 18 and 19 July 1950, Rochester supported landings on Pohang Dong by the Army's 1st Cavalry Division. She continued to serve with Task Force 77 until 25 August 1950.

Rochester's guns provided support for the troops that landed at Inch'on on 15 September in the operation that prompted General MacArthur's proud signal that "the Navy and Marines have never shown more brightly than this morning."

During the months of October, November, and December, Rochester operated continuously along the Korean coast for 81 days, providing gunfire support to troops ashore and serving as a mobile helicopter base. Helos were kept aloft constantly to aid the minesweepers in opening the ports of Changjon, Koje, Wonsan, Hungnam, and Songjin. In addition to destroying six mines by her own gunfire, the cruiser controlled naval air operations in the Wonsan area during the 10 days preceding the arrival of landing forces. Her helicopters also aided in the rescue of survivors from the minesweepers Pirate (AM-275) and Pledge (AM-277), sunk in Wonsan Harbor.

During 198 days of operations against the Communist forces in Korea, she steamed over 25,000 miles and expended 3,265 eight-inch and 2,339 five-inch projectiles. Rochester then called at Sasebo, Japan, and on 10 January 1951 headed for home, arriving at Long Beach 30 January. Ten days later she steamed for her scheduled yard overhaul at Mare Island Naval Shipyard, San Francisco, which took her through May.

During refresher training in the Long Beach-San Diego area, Rochester assisted in training crews for the ships that were being taken out of mothballs. She departed Long Beach 27 August 1951 for training in the Hawaiian area, after which she steamed for Yokosuka, Japan, arriving there 21 November. On 28 November, she blasted Kosong with more han 250 rounds of high explosive.

She then ranged the entire northeastern Korean coastline, bombarding ground targets, while her helicopters flew rescue missions for Task Force 77 aviators. Into the spring she continued harassment and interdiction missions along the eastern coast of Korea.

In early April 1952, she spent a week as flagship of the Blockading and Escorting Forces on Korea's west coast, and in late April, she steamed for her homeport. May through October was given over to in-port time at Long Beach and to coastal training operations. In November, the cruiser departed for another WestPac tour, arriving back on station as a unit of Task Group 77.1 (Support Group) in the waters off eastern Korea 7 December.

After spending the winter months in harassment and interdiction missions and other operations with the fast carrier task force, Rochester steamed home, arriving Long Beach, 6 April 1953.

End of War

During her regularly scheduled yard period at Mare Island, 4 May to 7 September 1953, her 20mm. and 40mm. batteries were replaced with 3-inch/50 rapid-fire guns. Coastal refresher training was followed by a 5 January 1954 departure for WestPac. The normal exercises and port calls of a WestPac deployment ended with her departure from Yokosuka 29 May for the west coast.

In February 1955, Rochester served on her fifth WestPac deployment, completing that cruise 6 August and arriving at her homeport the 22d. An overhaul at the San Francisco Naval Shipyard commenced 19 November 1955 and was completed 7 March 1956. Thence came refresher training and preparations for yet another WestPac deployment. This sixth Pacific tour commenced 29 May when Rochester and her escorts stood out of Long Beach. It was 16 December when the ships returned to homeport.

The first week of June 1957 found Rochester in San Francisco, where she acted as flagship for Fleet Adm. Chester W. Nimitz as he reviewed the 1st Fleet. Returning to Long Beach the 18th, she resumed local operations and exercises until her departure on 3 September for her seventh WestPac deployment. She returned to Long Beach 24 March 1958. Two more WestPac deployments followed, 6 January to 17 June 1959 and 5 April to 29 October 1960.

Rochester was ordered to report to the Commander, Bremerton Group, Pacific Reserve Fleet on 15 April 1961 for inactivation. She departed Long Beach 12 April, reported to the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, and she was placed out of commission, in reserve, 15 August 1961. She remained at Bremerton until struck from the Navy list on 1 October 1973 and sold for scrap on 23 September 1974.

Rochester received six battle stars for Korean war service.

 

19 October 2005

Published:Mon Aug 31 12:00:42 EDT 2015

 

 

July 17-18 1950The ROCHESTER [CA 124] supported landings at Pohang Dong. and would continue to operate with Task Force 77 until 25 Aug. 1950, as an escort ship for the Fast Carrier Task Force of the 7th Fleet, or as a gunfire support ship. She would sail up and down the coast of Korea supplying the U. N. Forces with the fire support they had requested and also fire on targets in areas occupied by the North Korean Army.