Unit Details

USS DE HAVEN (DD-727)

 NavSource Naval History: DESTROYER ARCHIVE

 



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Flag Hoist/Radio Call Sign - NHVF

Tactical Voice Radio Call Sign (circa 1968) - SCARF

ALLEN M. SUMNER CLASS DESTROYER - Interior Photographs

CLASS - ALLEN M. SUMNER As Built.
Displacement 3218 Tons (Full), Dimensions, 376' 6"(oa) x 40' 10" x 14' 2" (Max)
Armament 6 x 5"/38AA (3x2), 12 x 40mm AA, 11 x 20mm AA, 10 x 21" tt.(2x5).
Machinery, 60,000 SHP; General Electric Geared Turbines, 2 screws
Speed, 36.5 Knots, Range 3300 NM@ 20 Knots, Crew 336.
Operational and Building Data
Laid down by Bath Iron Works, Bath Me. August 9 1943.
Launched January 9 1944 and commissioned March 31 1944.
Completed FRAM upgrade August 1960.
Decommissioned and stricken December 3 1973.
USN_Units To South Korea December 5 1973, renamed Incheon.
Fate Stricken and broken up for scrap in 1993.
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Size Image Description Contributed
By
DeHaven 31k Edwin Jess De Haven, born in 1819 in Pennsylvania was appointed Acting Midshipman at the age of 10 and Passed Midshipman 5 years later. He served in Vincennes, flagship of the Wilkes Exploring Expedition in its historic cruise of 1838 to 1842 to the Antarctic and among the Pacific Islands. De Haven served in the Mexican War, assisting in the capture of the Mexican schooner Creole. In command of the Grinnell Rescue Expedition in 1850, he led the search for Sir John Franklin lost in the Arctic. Only traces of the party were found, but De Haven discovered and named Grinnell Land, and was commended for the valuable scientific data he collected concerning the winds and currents of the ocean. He served in the Coast Survey Service until placed on the retired list in February 1862. He died at Philadelphia, Pa., 1 May 1865. Image from the USS DeHaven Association. Bill Gonyo
DeHaven 154k Artist's conception of the De Haven as built in a cutaway view by the renowned graphic illustrator John Barrett with the text written by naval author and historian Robert F. Sumrall. Their company Navy Yard Associates offers prints of most destroyers, destroyer escorts, submarines and aircraft carriers in various configurations during the ship's lifetime. The prints can be customized with ship's patches, your photograph, your bio, etc. If you decide to purchase artwork from them please indicate that you heard about their work from NavSource. Navy Yard Associates
De Haven 100k Artist's conception of the De Haven as she appeared following her FRAM II overhaul by the renowned graphic illustrator John Barrett with the text written by naval author and historian Robert F. Sumrall. Their company Navy Yard Associatesoffers prints of most destroyers, destroyer escorts, submarines and aircraft carriers in various configurations during the ship's lifetime. The prints can be customized with ship's patches, your photograph, your bio, etc. If you decide to purchase artwork from them please indicate that you heard about their work from NavSource. Navy Yard Associates
De Haven 79k Undated, USS DeHaven (DD-727) and two other destroyers alongside the USS Isle Royal (AD-29) in Long Beach. Richard Miller, BMCS, USNR (Ret.)
De Haven 24k Undated, USS Mansfield (DD-728) and USS DeHaven (DD-727) in Yokosuka. Richard Miller, BMCS, USNR (Ret.)
De Haven 115k Undated, location unknown. Richard Miller, BMCS, USNR (Ret.)
De Haven 86k Launching January 9 1944 at Bath Iron Works. Ron Reeves
De Haven 46k The ship is painted in camouflage Measure 32, Design 3d, circa 1944. Later distributed to crew. Bill Coffin collection. D.Schroeder/J.Chiquoine
De Haven 108k Alongside carrier in refueling activity, Fall 1944. NARA 80G245741. John Chiquoine
De Haven 87k Fall 1945, photo by Bill Coffin. D.Schroeder/J.Chiquoine
De Haven 104k Homeward Bound Pennant aboard DEHAVEN, Fall 1945, photo by Bill Coffin. D.Schroeder/J.Chiquoine
De Haven 117k One of USS De Haven (DD 727) propellers has been removed during her overhaul at Mare Island on 8 Nov 1945. Darryl Baker
De Haven 152k USS DeHaven (DD-727) and USS Maddox (DD-731) at Mare Island in December 1945. Ed Zajkowski/Bill Gonyo
De Haven 58k December 1945, Mare Island. Pieter Bakels
De Haven 63k Navy Photo 7471-45, broadside view of USS De Haven (DD 727) off Mare Island on 10 Dec 1945. She was in overhaul at Mare Island from 29 Oct to 17 Dec 45. Darryl Baker
De Haven 85k Navy Photo 7473-45, bow on view USS De Haven (DD 727) moored at the South end of Mare Island on 10 Dec 1945. Darryl Baker
De Haven 34k ATA-122, USS De Haven (DD 727) and USS Mansfield (DD 728) are about to undock for Mare Island's dry dock 3 during Navy Day celebrations at Mare Island on 27 Oct 1947. The USS Mansfield is to the left of USS De Haven and she is behind ATA-122. Darryl Baker
De Haven 88k Navy Photo 2126-47, bow on view of USS De Haven (DD 727) anchored off Mare Island on 5 Nov 1947. Darryl Baker
De Haven 96k Navy Photo 2128-47, broadside view of USS De Haven (DD 727) off Mare Island on 5 Nov 1947. She was in overhaul at the yard from 10 Sep to 18 Nov 1947. Darryl Baker
De Haven 102k Navy Photo 2130-47, stern view of USS De Haven (DD 727) off Mare Island on 5 Nov 1947. Darryl Baker
De Haven 104k Navy Photo 2219-47, aft plan view of USS De Haven (DD 727) with USS Mansfield (DD 728) outboard at Mare Island on 12 Nov 1947. Darryl Baker
De Haven 176k Navy Photo 2221-47, forward plan view of USS De Haven (DD 727) with USS Mansfield (DD 728) outboard at Mare Island on 12 Nov 1947. Darryl Baker
De Haven 103k Navy Photo 2205-47, aft plan view of USS Mansfield (DD 728) outboard of USS De Haven (DD 727) at Mare Island on 12 Nov 1947. She was in overhaul at the yard from 10 Sep to 21 Nov 1947. Darryl Baker
De Haven 183k Navy Photo 2207-47, forward plan view of USS Mansfield (DD 728) outboard of USS De Haven (DD 727) at Mare Island on 12 Nov 1947. Darryl Baker
De Haven 84k Circa July-August 1948, Destroyer Division 91 (L to R) 728 Mansfield (flag ship); 730 Collett; 727 DeHaven and 729 Lyman K. Swenson, at buoy in San Diego harbor. Richard A. Bowman QM2
De Haven 77k San Diego, circa 1950's. Marc Piché
De Haven 55k From the January 1952 ALL HANDS magazine. Stanley Svec
De Haven 202k Men of Destroyer Division 91 crowd the foc'sle and superstructure of their ships in Sasebo, Japan, to receive their Navy Unit Commendations. During the presentation on the Mansfield, a crane crew in the background continues its task of installing new gun barrels on the De Haven. Streaks of red lead on the Collett and the Swenson in the foreground show the work that has occupied all the crews while in port. By coincidence the famed 'Sitting Duck' destroyers are berthed in their numerical order: USS De Haven (DD-727), Mansfield (DD-728), Lyman K. Swenson (DD-729), and Collett (DD-730)." Photograph and caption released by Commander Naval Forces, Far East, under date of 18 December 1951. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the "All Hands" collection at the Naval Historical Center. Joe Radigan
De Haven 85k Circa 1955, location unknown. George Ireland
De Haven 107k July 1958, location unknown. Robert Hurst
De Haven 83k Taken just after FRAM in San Francisco (about 1960), photographer unknown. Don Hope
De Haven 233k We believe this was taken as the USS De Haven (DD 727) was transiting San Francisco Bay circa 1960-1961 after modernization under the FRAM program. Photo courtesy of Scott Martin of the DeHaven Sailors Association. Bill Gonyo
De Haven 205k This photo was originally published in the November 1960 issue of CruDesPac News. The four ships were manning the rail to salute President Eisenhower as he passed by in his barge. The President is standing topside in the barge, midships. The other ships in the picture are USS Wiltsie (DD 716), USS Hamner (DD718), and USS Morton (DD948). We were moored in San Diego Bay. Al Creasy, ENS USS Morton
De Haven 138k Underway in the 1960's. K. Dupree, YNCS, USN(Ret)
De Haven 72k Yokosuka Japan, June 14 1966 © Richard Leonhardt
De Haven 67k Yokosuka Japan, June 14 1966 © Richard Leonhardt
De Haven 90k Yokosuka Japan, June 1966. Good Image Of Her Towed Sonar Gear © Richard Leonhardt
De Haven 74k Yokosuka Japan, June 14 1966 © Richard Leonhardt
De Haven 175k Photo by Jerry Feola, VAW-33 Det. 11, aboard USS Intrepid (CVS 11) during her 1967 Vietnam cruise, May 11-Dec 30. Jerry Feola
De Haven 105k As viewed from the USS Ticonderoga's 1968 Vietnam cruise (Dec. 28, 1967 - Aug. 17, 1968). Jerry Beasley
De Haven 179k As above. Jerry Beasley
De Haven 99k This one is an official Navy Photo taken underway off the coast of Oahu, Hawaii, 11/19/70. Photographer C.P. Weston, PM3 Sam Barraco
De Haven 78k Off Oahu, Hawaii, 19 November 1970. Robert Hurst
De Haven 53k San Francisco September 1973. Marc Piché
De Haven 105k USS Lyman K. Swenson (DD-729) Moored at San Diego, California, with two other destroyers, circa 1945-46. Middle ship is USS De Haven (DD-727). Courtesy of John Hummel, 1979. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph. Fred Weiss
DeHaven 32k DesRon 9 in Long Beach; USS Collett (DD-730), USS Lyman K. Swenson (DD-729), USS Mansfield (DD-728) and USS De Haven (DD-727). Richard Miller BMCS USNR (Ret.)
De Haven 64k Ship's patch. Mike Smolinski
De Haven 43k Ship's patch. Mike Smolinski
De Haven 46k Ship's patch. Mike Smolinski
De Haven 50k Ship's patch. Mike Smolinski
De Haven 100k-120k Uniform Ship's name shoulder patch. Al Grazevich




Commanding Officers
Thanks to Wolfgang Hechler & Ron Reeves

CDR John Bagley Dimmick    Mar 31 1944 - Jun 17 1945
CDR William Heald Groverman Jr.    Jun 17 1945 - Dec 6 1946 (Later RADM)
CDR William Metcalfe Kaufman    Dec 6 1946 - Aug 19 1948
CDR Millard John Smith    Aug 19 1948 - Oct 15 1950
CDR Oscar Berndherd Lundgren    Oct 15 1950 - Apr 1 1951
CDR Farrell Burton McFarland    Apr 1 1951 - Jun 17 1952
CDR Theodore Charles Siegmund    Jun 17 1952 - Oct 10 1953
CDR Thomas Ward Hunt    Oct 10 1953 - Aug 1 1955
CDR Floyd Murphy Symons    Aug 1 1955 - Oct 3 1957
CDR John Joseph Phillips    Oct 3 1957 - Apr 9 1959
CDR William Calhoun Singletary - Apr 9 1959 - Oct 21 1961
CDR James Ward Montgomery    Oct 21 1961 - Jul 24 1963 (Later ADM)
CDR John Augustine Delaney    Jul 24 1963 - Aug 13 1964
CDR Robert Perry Chrisler    Aug 13 1964 - May 2 1966
CAPT Donald Anthony Franz    May 2 1966 - Aug 6 1968
CDR Edward Joseph Casey Jr.    Aug 6 1968 - Jan 15 1970
CDR Henry Clay Morris Jr.    Jan 15 1970 - Jul 15 1972
CDR Howard Frederick Burdick Jr.    Jul 15 1972 - Feb 23 1973
CDR Joe Duke Edwards    Feb 23 1973 - Sep 21 1973
LCDR Ronald Lynn Bunce    Sep 21 1973 - Dec 3 1973


USS De Haven (DD-727)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

USN_Units


Career (US)


Namesake: Edwin De Haven


Builder: Bath Iron Works


Laid down: 9 August 1943
Launched: 9 January 1944
Commissioned: 31 March 1944
Decommissioned: c.1973

Struck: 3 December 1973
Fate: To South Korea 5 December 1973



General characteristics
Class and type: Allen M. Sumner-class destroyer


Displacement: 2,200 tons
Length: 376 ft 6 in (114.8 m)
Beam: 40 ft (12.2 m)
Draft: 15 ft 8 in (4.8 m)


Propulsion:
60,000 shp (45 MW)
2 propellers
Speed: 34 knots (63 km/h)
Range: 6500 nm @ 15 kn (12,000 km @ 28 km/h)


Complement: 336


Armament: 6 × 5 in /38 cal guns (12 cm),
12 × 40 mm AA guns,
11 × 20 mm AA guns,
10 × 21 in torpedo tubes,
6 × depth charge projectors,
2 × depth charge tracks


USS De Haven (DD-727), an Allen M. Sumner-class destroyer, was the second ship of the United States Navy to be named for Lieutenant Edwin J. De Haven. De Haven served aboard the Vincennes, flagship of the Wilkes Expedition, officially known as the United States Exploring Expedition, from 1839 to 1842. De Haven also served in the Mexican-American War, assisting in the capture of the Mexican schooner Creole. He was placed on the retired list in February 1862. He died at Philadelphia on 1 May 1865.


De Haven was launched on 9 January 1944 by Bath Iron Works Corp., Bath, Maine, sponsored by Miss H. N. De Haven; and commissioned on 31 March 1944, Commander J. B. Dimmick in command



Service history


United States Navy
World War II


De Haven escorted Ranger from Norfolk to Pearl Harbor, arriving on 3 August 1944. She screened a convoy to Eniwetok between 16 and 30 August, and returned to Eniwetok on 5 October. A week later, she got underway for Ulithi to join TF 38. Operating from this base, she screened the fast carriers striking Luzon in support of the invasion of Leyte during November and December. In coordination with the invasion of Lingayen Gulf, Luzon, the force hit Formosa, Luzon, Camranh Bay, Hong Kong, Hainan, and Okinawa in a score of strikes extending from 30 December 1944 to 26 January 1945.


On 10 February 1945, De Haven sortied from Ulithi with TF 58, to prepare for the invasion of Iwo Jima, striking the Japanese mainland as well as the Nansei Shoto, and then providing fire support for the invading troops. Returning to Ulithi on 4 March, she sailed 10 days later to screen air strikes on Kyushu, Japan, prior to the invasion of Okinawa. Until 13 June, she screened the carriers and gave fire support at Okinawa. On 1 July, she sailed from Leyte with TF 38 for the final air strikes and bombardments on the Japanese homeland which continued until the end of the war. Present in Tokyo Bay 2 September for the signing of the surrender, De Haven sailed on 20 September for the States, arriving at San Francisco on 15 October.


Between 1 February 1946 and 3 February 1947, De Haven served in the Western Pacific, joining the 7th Fleet in operations off the coast of China, and patrolling off the Japanese coast. She operated along the west coast through 1948 and 1949, and on 1 May 1950 cleared San Diego for another tour of duty in the western Pacific, arriving at Yokosuka the last day of May.


Korea

June 25, 1950

          In Tokyo the 25th of June found the headquarters of Naval Forces Far East settled down for a normal peacetime weekend.  Then the telephone rang, and when the Lieutenant Colonel of Marines who was Staff Duty Officer that day picked up the receiver he found himself talking to the Military Attaché at Sŏul. This conversation put an end to holiday routine. Within minutes the headquarters had shifted to a state of readiness, and overnight it became clear that war, at least of a sort, was at hand. The unexpected nature of the Korean involvement and the speed with which the crisis broke meant that most NavFE planning, like that of other military headquarters, had to be thrown out the porthole. But it was at least possible to salvage so much of it as was concerned with the evacuation of American citizens. On the 25th, as American civilians and their dependents were ordered out of the Sŏul area by Ambassador Muccio, ComNavFE instructed Admiral Higgins to send USS Mansfield (DD-728) and USS De Haven (DD-727) to cover the exodus from the port of Inch'ŏn. 

Pusan, the only major port of entry available for the movement of supplies and reinforcements to South Korea, was at the time almost wholly defenseless, the drowning of the 600 in the Battle of Korea Straight was an event of profound strategic importance.

 


When North Korea invaded South Korea on 25 June 1950, De Haven was assigned to patrol off the Korean coast. She screened the Norwegian ship Reinholt evacuating American dependents from Inch'ŏn to Yokosuka; patrolled on the blockade; bombarded shore targets; acted as lifeguard and communications linking ship for air strikes against Pyongyang and Haeju; and provided call fire support for United Nations troops.
On 13 and 14 September, she stood up a treacherous channel to anchor a scant 800 yards from Wolmi-do island and poured fire into the concealed gun emplacements in preparation for the assault on Inch'ŏn. De Haven provided gunfire support for the successful landings the following day, and for her part in this daring action was awarded the Navy Unit Commendation.


Returning to blockade duty on 25 September 1950, De Haven dispersed a North Korean force attempting to ambush a Korean Army unit; aided Brush and escorted her to Sasebo; and provided fire support for a British Commando raid on 6 and 7 October. She cleared Yokosuka on 1 November for San Diego, arriving 18 November.


During De Haven's second tour of Korean duty from 18 June 1951 to 17 February 1952, she served primarily on blockade patrol. After an overhaul and local operations at San Diego, she sailed from Long Beach 16 September 1952 to serve as flagship for ships on patrol in the Ch'ŏngjin-Sŏngjin-Chaho area until 18 November. After patrol duty with TF 77, she returned to Korean waters for duty with TF 95 on patrol off Wŏnsan Harbor, supporting the minesweeping operations there from 12 to 18 February. She got underway from Sasebo 22 March for Long Beach, arriving on 9 April.


Refugee Controversy


According to declassified documents obtained by the Associated Press, U.S. commanders repeatedly ordered refugees from South Korea shot. While the most famous example of this policy remains the No Gun Ri Massacre, another incident, on 1 September 1950, has been confirmed by the declassified official diary of De Haven. It states that the Navy destroyer, at Army insistence, fired on a seaside refugee encampment at Pohang, South Korea. Survivors say 100 to 200 people were killed.[1][2]
De Haven continued to alternate duty in the western Pacific with local operations along the west coast, making six voyages to the Far East from 1953 through 1959.

 

De Haven participated in Operation Hardtack I near Eniwetok Island during the summer of 1958, witnessing approximately 22 nuclear detonations, one from only three nautical miles. She was also one of the US Navy vessels that ran the Chinese naval blockade on Quemoy-Matsu. On 1 February 1960, she began a major overhaul for modernization at San Francisco, completed in September. De Haven returned to training activities through the remaining months of 1960.



References
^ "1950 `shoot refugees' letter was known to No Gun Ri inquiry, but went undisclosed". The Associated Press. April 13, 2007.
^ British Broadcasting Corp., October Films. "Kill 'em All." Timewatch. February 1, 2002
This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. The entry can be found here.

June 25, 1950

In June 1950, slightly more than one-third of the United States naval operating forces were in the Pacific under the command of Admiral Arthur W. Radford. Only about one-fifth of this was in Far Eastern waters.

Vice Adm. Charles Turner Joy commanded U.S. Naval Forces, Far East. The naval strength of the Far East Command when the Korean War started comprised

1 cruiser, the USS Juneau (CLAA-119);

4 destroyers, the USS Mansfield (DD-728), USS De Haven (DD-727), USS Collett (DD-730), and USS Lyman K. Swenson (DD-729);

and a number of amphibious and cargo-type vessel

June 25, 1950

        With all ships on the western and southern coasts, no strength was immediately available to oppose the east coast landings.  Nevertheless the ROK units at once put to sea, and on the evening of the 25th there took place the most important surface engagement of the war. Northeast of Pusan PC 701, Commander Nam Choi Yong, ROKN, encountered a 1,000 ton armed steamer with some 600 troops embarked, and sank it after a running fight. Since

          In Tokyo the 25th of June found the headquarters of Naval Forces Far East settled down for a normal peacetime weekend.  Then the telephone rang, and when the Lieutenant Colonel of Marines who was Staff Duty Officer that day picked up the receiver he found himself talking to the Military Attaché at Sŏul. This conversation put an end to holiday routine. Within minutes the headquarters had shifted to a state of readiness, and overnight it became clear that war, at least of a sort, was at hand. The unexpected nature of the Korean involvement and the speed with which the crisis broke meant that most NavFE planning, like that of other military headquarters, had to be thrown out the porthole. But it was at least possible to salvage so much of it as was concerned with the evacuation of American citizens. On the 25th, as American civilians and their dependents were ordered out of the Sŏul area by Ambassador Muccio, ComNavFE instructed Admiral Higgins to send USS Mansfield (DD-728) and USS De Haven (DD-727) to cover the exodus from the port of Inch'ŏn. 

Pusan, the only major port of entry available for the movement of supplies and reinforcements to South Korea, was at the time almost wholly defenseless, the drowning of the 600 in the Battle of Korea Straight was an event of profound strategic importance.