Unit Details

Soviet Armed Forces

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Armed Forces of the
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics
Вооружённые Силы Союза Советских Социалистических Республик
Vooruzhonnyye Sily Soyuza Sovetskikh Sotsialisticheskikh Respublik
Founded 15 January 1918
Current form 23 February 1946
Disbanded 25 December 1991
Service branches Soviet Army
Soviet Air Forces
Soviet Navy
Soviet Air Defence Forces
Strategic Missile Troops
Headquarters Moscow, Russian SFSR
Leadership
Supreme Commander Joseph Stalin (19411953)
Mikhail Gorbachev (19901991)
Minister of Defence Joseph Stalin (19461947)
Yevgeny Shaposhnikov (1991)
Chief of the General Staff Aleksandr Vasilevsky (19461948)
Vladimir Lobov (1991)
Manpower
Military age 1827
Conscription 18
Available for
military service
92,345,764 (1991), age 1827
Active personnel 4,230,920 (1991)
Expenditures
Budget $300 billion (1990)
Percent of GDP 12.9% (1990)
Related articles
History Military history of the Soviet Union
Ranks Military ranks of the Soviet Union

The Soviet Armed Forces, also called the Armed Forces of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and Armed Forces of the Soviet Union (Russian: Вооружённые Силы Союза Советских Социалистических Республик Vooruzhonnyye Sily Soyuza Sovetskikh Sotsialisticheskikh Respublik, Вооружённые Силы Советского Союза) refers to the armed forces of the Russian SFSR (19171922), and Soviet Union (19221991) from their beginnings in the aftermath of the Russian Civil War to its dissolution in December 1991.

According to the all-union military service law of September 1925, the Soviet Armed Forces consisted of three components: the Ground Forces, the Air Forces, the Navy, the State Political Directorate (OGPU), and the convoy guards. The OGPU was later made independent and amalgamated with the NKVD in 1934, and thus its Internal Troops were under the joint management of the Defense and Interior Commisariats. After World War II, the Strategic Missile Troops (1959), Air Defence Forces (1948) and troops of the All-Union National Civil Defence Forces (1970) were added, standing first, third and sixth in the official Soviet reckoning of comparative importance (with the Ground Forces being second, the Air Forces fourth, and the Navy fifth).